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AI is sending people to jail--and getting it wrong

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AI might not seem to have a huge personal impact if your most frequent brush with machine-learning algorithms is through Facebook's news feed or Google's search rankings. But at the Data for Black Lives conference last weekend, technologists, legal experts, and community activists snapped things into perspective with a discussion of America's criminal justice system. There, an algorithm can determine the trajectory of your life. At the end of 2016, nearly 2.2 million adults were being held in prisons or jails, and an additional 4.5 million were in other correctional facilities. Put another way, 1 in 38 adult Americans was under some form of correctional supervision.


Data Collection Bias Assessment

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Prevention is better than cure. Therefore, we offer you the Data Collection Bias Assessment form. Using this form, you make a few choices from the beginning of the data collection so that you can discover possible biases at an early stage. What kind of biases do we mean by this? There are different kinds of prejudices or biases.


We Need To Examine The Ethics And Governance Of Artificial Intelligence

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Five Thirty Eight: Technology Is Biased Too. Growing up, one of my favorite movies was Steven Spielberg's Minority Report. I was fascinated by the idea that a crime could be prevented before it occurred. More interesting to me at the time was the futuristic role that'super intelligent' technology – something depicted as more sophisticated and advanced than humans – could play in doing this accurately. Recently, the role that pre-crime and artificial intelligence can play in our world has been explored in episodes of the popular Netflix TV show Black Mirror, focusing on the debate between free will and determinism.


We Need to be Examining the Ethics and Governance of Artificial Intelligence - AI Trends

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Growing up, one of my favorite movies was Steven Spielberg's Minority Report. I was fascinated by the idea that a crime could be prevented before it occurred. More interesting to me at the time was the futuristic role that'super intelligent' technology – something depicted as more sophisticated and advanced than humans – could play in doing this accurately. Recently, the role that pre-crime and artificial intelligence can play in our world has been explored in episodes of the popular Netflix TV show Black Mirror, focusing on the debate between free will and determinism. Working in counter-terrorism, I know that the use of artificial intelligence in the security space is fast becoming a reality.


Artificial Intelligence Is Already Sending People To Jail -- And Getting It Wrong

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As machine-learning algorithms, big data methods and artificial intelligence are increasingly used in the toolkit of U.S. law enforcement agencies, many are worrying that the existing biases of the criminal justice system are simply being automated – and deepened. Police departments are increasingly relying on predictive algorithms to figure out where to deploy their forces by blanketing cities with a mesh of human-based and computerized surveillance technology including, but not limited to, data-mining, facial recognition, and predictive policing programs. This comes despite the flaw in such tools. Facial recognition software have often held a bias toward darker-skinned individuals, including mistaking members of Congress for criminal suspects. In essence, racial profiling has become automated while allowing law enforcement agencies to claim that the computers are race-neutral tools.