Six megatrends that could alter the course of sustainable development

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We are approaching two years into implementing the ambitious 2030 Agenda – a historic agreement to end poverty, combat inequalities, promote peaceful and inclusive societies, and protect the environment. The new global framework, with 17 sustainable development goals (SDGs) at its core, commits to promoting development in an integrated way – economically, socially and environmentally – in all countries, ensuring that no one is left behind. Our recently published report identifies six megatrends that will shape the trajectories of – and could potentially undermine – progress on the SDGs. In the current context of a looming retreat from multilateralism, the choices governments and societies make to manage these long-term trends will be fundamental to whether the world can get onto a pathway of sustainable development. Substantial progress has been achieved in multiple dimensions of poverty in the past decades, including the reduction of absolute poverty, decline in child and maternal mortality rates, and improved access to clean water and sanitation facilities.


Innovative ideas to address global challenges

The Japan Times

As a forerunner facing various social challenges, including addressing the aging population, as well as environmental and energy issues, Japan is poised to find solutions and share them with other countries that are also expected to be confronted with these complex problems. Through hosting the upcoming G20 summit in Osaka in June, the country will promote further cooperation among all relevant stakeholders, both government and non-governmental, toward a future society that realizes both economic growth and solutions for such issues. The annual meeting of the World Economic Forum (WEF) in Davos, Switzerland, will be a timely occasion for world leaders to address these growing challenges as the conference aims to delve into the topics to "shape a new framework for global cooperation," preparing for the arrival of "Globalization 4.0" driven by the "Fourth Industrial Revolution." Assuming the G20 presidency immediately after the Buenos Aires summit in December, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe stated Japan would seek to realize a "human-centered future society," promoting discussions in cross-cutting areas. "Japan is determined to lead global economic growth by promoting free trade and innovation, achieving both economic growth and reduction of disparities, and contributing to the development agenda and other global issues with the SDGs (United Nations Sustainable Development Goals) at its core," Abe said. "In addition, we will lead discussions on the supply of global commons for realizing global growth such as quality infrastructure and global health," he continued.


Assembling Corporate Vision With Social Prosperity And Security. Siemens Vision 2020

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"I will not sell the future for instant profit!" Werner von Siemens, 1884 In Atlas Shrugged (1957), by Ayn Rand, the system falls apart to the point that the remaining producers choose to simply withdraw rather than proliferate and disrupt the society from within. "In 1995, Fukuyama argued that only those societies with a high degree of social trust would be able to create the kind of flexible, large-scale business organizations that are needed for successful competition in the global economy." Carrying proudly the responsibility of its 170 years history and legacy, a Tech Giant, an Atlas of the modern era of turbulent markets and exponentially growing challenges, the largest industrial manufacturing company in Europe with its footprint in 180 countries around the globe, the German conglomerate company Siemens AG (German pronunciation: [ˈziːmɛns]) is shaping the future – the digital future. "With its Vision 2020, Siemens has recently once again clearly answered these questions: a company faces up to its responsibilities, furnishes lasting benefit and generates added value from a position of strength – for its shareholders, employees, customers, business partners and societies all over the world. Joe Kaeser, President and Chief Executive Officer of Siemens AG, puts it like this: "Only the strong can help the weak, take responsibility and then fulfill it.


G-20 finance chiefs call for 'further dialogue and actions' as trade war looms

The Japan Times

BUENOS AIRES – Financial leaders from the Group of 20 advanced and emerging economies on Tuesday recognized the need for "further dialogue and actions" on trade, while reaffirming their commitment to combat protectionism as a trade war looms. Their conclusions at the end of their two-day talks come as the United States is set to impose heavy tariffs on steel and aluminum imports on Friday, an action President Donald Trump said is aimed at defending national security. The G-20 finance ministers and central bankers' views are in line with their leaders' promise made last July to "continue to fight protectionism" in ways that would also allow countries to take "legitimate trade defense" steps against unfair practices. "International trade and investment are important engines of growth, productivity, innovation, job creation and development," they said in their joint statement on Tuesday. "We reaffirm the conclusions of our leaders on trade at the Hamburg Summit and recognize the need for further dialogue and actions.


G7 ministerial meetings

The Japan Times

The G7 foreign ministers issued the "Hiroshima Declaration on Nuclear Disarmament and Non-Proliferation" to reaffirm their commitment to creating a world without nuclear weapons, also naming Syria, Ukraine and North Korea as countries that may endanger that goal. In a separately adopted joint communique, the G7 nations condemn North Korea in particular for its repeated provocations. The Hiroshima meeting was held after the country conducted a nuclear test on Jan. 6 and launched ballistic missiles on Feb. 7. The joint statement condemned those activities "in the strongest terms." The ministers also shared concerns over the situation in the East and South China Seas, strongly opposing, in a separately issued joint statement, coercive or provocative actions to alter the present status quo. The agriculture ministers of the G7 nations adopted the "Niigata Declaration" aiming at strengthening global food security and stable food supply worldwide at a time when the world population is growing and some nations are experiencing aging societies.