Goto

Collaborating Authors

Finding the " Right " Robot Competition: Targeting Non-Engineering Undergraduates

AAAI Conferences

Robot competitions run the gamut from research-oriented challenges to K-12 contests aimed at basic problem-solving skills. For faculty and students at small colleges, with limited resources, finding the right level of competition can be a difficult proposition. At Macalester College we have hosted a series of robot competitions, inviting nearby colleges to participate. Our goals are to engage students with robots and artificial intelligence, to raise the profile of AI on campus, and to create ties among the different colleges. The contests succeeded in forging ties among the faculty who participated, and succeeded as extracurricular activities to interest students in computer science. The contests failed, however, to teach students much about AI and robotics techniques, and to engage students closely with sponsoring faculty members. I propose a model of local-area competitions that focus on AI and robotics concepts, rather than physical robot design, and that are respectful of the limited time and resources faculty and students have to contribute.


Highlights of the ACM Student Research Competition

Communications of the ACM

Since 2003, ACM in conjunction with Microsoft have sponsored research competitions for undergraduate and graduate students in computing. The competitions provide a vehicle for these students to present their original research before a panel of judges and attendees at well-known ACM-sponsored and co-sponsored conferences. The students have the opportunity to experience a research conference, get feedback on their research, meet academic and industrial researchers and other students, and appreciate the practical applications of their research. Student competitors also have the opportunity to sharpen communication, visual, organizational, and presentation skills in preparation for the SRC. Participation by undergraduates may be literally life-changing if they alter their career path to pursue graduate studies and research careers after experiencing a conference and competition.


Using Robot Competitions to Promote Intellectual Development

AI Magazine

The three competitions--(1) AAAI Mobile Robot, (2) AUVS Unmanned Ground Robotics, and (3) IJCAI RoboCup--were used in different years for an introductory undergraduate robotics course, an advanced graduate robotics course, and an undergraduate practicum course. Based on these experiences, a strategy is presented for incorporating competitions into courses in such a way as to foster intellectual maturation as well as learn lessons in organizing courses and fielding teams. The article also provides a classification of the major robot competitions and discusses the relative merits of each for educational projects, including the expected course level of computer science students, equipment needed, and costs. The sponsorship of such competitions ranges from local clubs of enthusiasts to large professional organizations, such as the American Association for Artificial Intelligence (AAAI), which sponsors the annual AAAI Mobile Robot Competition and Exhibition as part of its annual ...


Using Robot Competitions to Promote Intellectual Development

AI Magazine

This article discusses five years of experience using three international mobile robot competitions as the foundation for educational projects in undergraduate and graduate computer science courses. The three competitions -- (1) AAAI Mobile Robot, (2) AUVS Unmanned Ground Robotics, and (3) IJCAI RoboCup -- were used in different years for an introductory undergraduate robotics course, an advanced graduate robotics course, and an undergraduate practicum course. Based on these experiences, a strategy is presented for incorporating competitions into courses in such a way as to foster intellectual maturation as well as learn lessons in organizing courses and fielding teams. The article also provides a classification of the major robot competitions and discusses the relative merits of each for educational projects, including the expected course level of computer science students, equipment needed, and costs.


RoboCup-2003: New Scientific and Technical Advances

AI Magazine

This article reports on the RoboCup-2003 event. RoboCup is no longer just the Soccer World Cup for autonomous robots but has evolved to become a coordinated initiative encompassing four different robotics events: (1) Soccer, (2) Rescue, (3) Junior (focused on education), and (4) a Scientific Symposium. RoboCup-2003 took place from 2 to 11 July 2003 in Padua (Italy); it was colocated with other scientific events in the field of AI and robotics. In this article, in addition to reporting on the results of the games, we highlight the robotics and AI technologies exploited by the teams in the different leagues and describe the most meaningful scientific contributions.