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Dear Care and Feeding: Am I Selfish for Forcing Vegetables on My Meat-and-Carbs Family?

Slate

Care and Feeding is Slate's parenting advice column. Have a question for Care and Feeding? Submit it here or post it in the Slate Parenting Facebook group. I am so done with being treated like I am a jerk just because I try to expand my husband and kid's palate. My husband even called me selfish today.


The Impossible Burger: Inside the Strange Science of the Fake Meat That 'Bleeds'

WIRED

The cook, complete with hair net, lays the red patty down on the grill and gives it a press with a spatula. And there, that unmistakable sizzle and smell. She flips the patty and gives it another press, lets it sit, presses it, and pulls it off the grill and onto a bun. This is no diner, and this is no ordinary cook. Here a company called Impossible Foods has over the last six years done something not quite impossible, but definitely unlikely: Engineering a plant-based burger that smells, tastes, looks, and even feels like ground beef.


California could require cancer warning labels on coffee at Starbucks, other retailers

Los Angeles Times

A future cup of coffee in California could give you jitters before you even take a sip. A nonprofit group wants coffee manufacturers, distributors and retailers to post ominous warnings about a cancer-causing chemical stewing in every brew and has been presenting evidence in a Los Angeles courtroom to make its case. The long-running lawsuit that resumed Monday claims Starbucks and about 90 other companies, including grocery stores and retail shops, failed to follow a state law requiring warning signs about hazardous chemicals found everywhere from household products to workplaces to the environment. At the center of the dispute is acrylamide, a carcinogen found in cooked foods such as French fries that is also a natural byproduct of the coffee roasting process. The coffee industry has acknowledged the presence of the chemical but asserts it is at harmless levels and is outweighed by benefits from drinking coffee.


Go Ahead and Try a Carolina Reaper Hot Sauce--We Dare You

Slate

Chances are you're one of millions who enjoy the nose-running, body-sweating, stomach-churning, mouth-burning effects of spicy food. Why do we, as a species, willingly (and enthusiastically) subject ourselves to this? What's really happening to our bodies when we dig into the hottest curry on the menu? Here are some explanations of what's physically going on inside you when you load up on heat. No, not when you ingest the amounts we typically consume in food.


Are potatoes now a cancer risk? Here's what you need to know

New Scientist

The UK Food Standards Agency (FSA) has launched a campaign warning of the cancer risk associated with cooking potatoes and other starchy foods at high temperatures. How worried should we be, and do we need to change the way we eat? This chemical is used in lots of industrial processes, including water purification, and to separate DNA molecules in experiments. Acrylamide is also found in some foods. Acrylamide is made by something called the Maillard reaction, which browns cooked foods and gives them their pleasing flavour.