Bomb-laden drones of Yemen's Houthi rebels seen threatening Arabian Peninsula

The Japan Times

DUBAI, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES - A Yemen rebel drone strike this week on a critical Saudi oil pipeline shows that the otherwise-peaceful sandy reaches of the Arabian Peninsula now are at risk of similar assault, including an under-construction nuclear power plant and Dubai International Airport, among the world's busiest. U.N. investigators said the Houthis' new UAV-X drone, found in recent months during the Saudi-led coalition's war in Yemen, likely has a range of up to 1,500 km (930 miles). That puts the far reaches of both Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates, the two main opponents of the Iranian-allied Houthi rebels in Yemen, within reach of drones difficult to detect and track. Their relatively simple design, coupled with readily available information online, makes targeting even easier, analysts say. "These installations are easily findable, like on Google Earth," said Tim Michetti, an expert on illicit weapons technology with experience in Yemen.


In a first since the Iran nuclear deal, Tehran will invite foreign firms to bid on oil and gas projects

Los Angeles Times

Iran will invite foreign companies to bid for oil and gas projects for the first time since last year's landmark nuclear deal with world powers, the country's Ministry of Petroleum said Sunday. The ministry did not say how many projects would be involved but said they include exploration and production in oil and gas fields, with the bidding process opening on Monday. It will be the first time Iran offers an international tender for oil and gas projects since the nuclear deal went into effect in January. The ministry's website said foreign companies should submit their applications by Nov. 19 and that successful companies would be announced on Dec. 7. Iran had previously said that priority for exploration and production for foreign companies would be given to neighboring countries with which it shares border fields.


Putin, Erdogan to meet at energy summit in Istanbul

U.S. News

The two are expected to advance joint energy projects, including Russian plans for a natural gas pipeline, called "Turkish Stream," that would carry gas beneath the Black Sea to Turkey and to European markets. Russia is also building Turkey's first nuclear power station.


Head of France's Total Urged Trump to Stick With Iran Nuclear Deal: FT

U.S. News

Total's CEO Patrick Pouyanne said he had raised the topic of Iran with Trump at a dinner in Davos in January, and asked the president to keep faith with the nuclear deal, arguing that oil and gas investment would help the cause of reformers in Tehran.


With nuclear deal under threat, Iran shows off centrifuges

FOX News

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates – The star of a live television interview in Iran's new nuclear workshop wasn't the head of the country's atomic agency, but three centrifuges labeled in English in the background, advanced devices Tehran is prohibited from using by the nuclear deal with world powers. The placement of the centrifuges, identified as IR-2M, IR-4 and IR-6, may have served as a subtle warning to Europe as it tries to salvage the atomic accord after President Donald Trump's decision to withdraw from it and restore U.S. sanctions. In recent days Iranian officials from Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei on down have vowed to boost the country's uranium enrichment capacity. The moves they have outlined would not violate the 2015 nuclear accord, but would allow Iran to quickly ramp up enrichment if the agreement unravels. "I think they've been quite clear in saying that if the U.S. pulls out and the EU doesn't live up to its side of the deal, it will rapidly increase its enrichment capacity," said Ian Stewart, the head of a nuclear proliferation study called Project Alpha at King's College London.