Elon Musk teases big Tesla news amid Model Y release date rumours

The Independent - Tech

Tesla CEO Elon Musk has teased a major announcement for the electric car maker, prompting speculation that a new vehicle may be unveiled this week. The serial entrepreneur, who has inexplicably changed his name to Elon Tusk on Twitter, posted a series of cryptic tweets on Wednesday that revealed there would be a Tesla event taking place on Thursday, 28 February, in California. Tesla has not made a new product announcement in 16 months, when it unveiled the new Roadster and semi-truck. During their unveiling in November 2017, Mr Musk also hinted that a Model Y utility vehicle was also being developed. In July 2018, Mr Musk revealed in an interview with Bloomberg that the Tesla Model Y was on track for a launch this year.


PS5: PlayStation gives first details of brand new console

The Independent - Tech

Sony has revealed the first details of the PS5, giving a wide-ranging look at what's inside the brand new console. The console will include a whole host of new hardware including CPUs and GPUs that can power technologies never before seen outside of the highest end computers, PlayStation claimed. But perhaps it's most significant new feature, which it says will be "a true game changer", is a new hard drive. The much faster solid state drive will allow the console to work far more quickly than existing hardware. An operation that once took 15 seconds will now take less than one, according to its architect Mark Cerny, who revealed the plans in an interview with Wired.


Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey says company was 'probably way too aggressive' in banning right-wing activists

The Independent - Tech

Twitter boss Jack Dorsey said the company has been too aggressive in banning right-wing activists from the site, despite some of them apparently being connected to harassment campaigns. Mr Dorsey and his company have been repeatedly criticised over the decisions it makes around who should stay on Twitter and who should be banned. Activists on both the left and the right have accused the site of hosting extremists, and having either too strict or too weak policies on banning users from the site. Now he has taken to the Joe Rogan Experience podcast for an interview with the comedian, during which he suggested the company could be more lenient with such bans in the future. We'll tell you what's true.


Sir Tim Berners-Lee slams internet's evolution and risks it poses to privacy

The Independent - Tech

Sir Tim Berners-Lee, the man credited with inventing the world wide web, has given a series of interviews in which he has criticised how the internet has developed, condemned how advertising has evolved and warned of the risks that global connectivity poses to users' privacy. In an interview with The Guardian, Sir Tim said that the Trump administration's decision to allow internet service providers to sign away their customers' privacy and sell users' browsing habits is "disgusting" and "appalling". The problem with the internet, he said, is that it can be "ridiculously revealing". "You have the right to go to a doctor in privacy where it's just between you and the doctor. And similarly, you have to be able to go to the web."


Apple blames weak iPhone China sales as it cuts revenue forecast

Al Jazeera

US tech giant Apple has taken the rare step of slashing its quarterly sales forecast, acknowledging that demand for iPhones is slowing and confirming investor concerns that its most profitable product has lost some of its consumer appeal amid competition from cheaper rivals. In a letter to shareholders, Chief Executive Officer Tim Cook said Apple's revenue for the October-December quarter - including the crucial holiday shopping season - will drop well below the company's earlier projections and those of analysts. Apple now expects revenue of $84bn for the period, below analysts' estimate of $91.5bn, according to IBES data from Refinitiv. The official results are scheduled to be released on January 29. The news sent Apple shares tumbling 7.7 percent in after-hours trade, triggering a broader selloff in the stock market and dragging the company's market value below $700bn.