Design of one-year mortality forecast at hospital admission based: a machine learning approach

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Background: Palliative care is referred to a set of programs for patients that suffer life-limiting illnesses. These programs aim to guarantee a minimum level of quality of life (QoL) for the last stage of life. They are currently based on clinical evaluation of risk of one-year mortality. Objectives: The main objective of this work is to develop and validate machine-learning based models to predict the exitus of a patient within the next year using data gathered at hospital admission. Methods: Five machine learning techniques were applied in our study to develop machine-learning predictive models: Support Vector Machines, K-neighbors Classifier, Gradient Boosting Classifier, Random Forest and Multilayer Perceptron. All models were trained and evaluated using the retrospective dataset. The evaluation was performed with five metrics computed by a resampling strategy: Accuracy, the area under the ROC curve, Specificity, Sensitivity, and the Balanced Error Rate. Results: All models for forecasting one-year mortality achieved an AUC ROC from 0.858 to 0.911. Specifically, Gradient Boosting Classifier was the best model, producing an AUC ROC of 0.911 (CI 95%, 0.911 to 0.912), a sensitivity of 0.858 (CI 95%, 0.856 to 0.86) and a specificity of 0.807 (CI 95%, 0.806 to 0808) and a BER of 0.168 (CI 95%, 0.167 to 0.169). Conclusions: The analysis of common information at hospital admission combined with machine learning techniques produced models with competitive discriminative power. Our models reach the best results reported in state of the art. These results demonstrate that they can be used as an accurate data-driven palliative care criteria inclusion.


Sparse Instrumental Variables (SPIV) for Genome-Wide Studies

Neural Information Processing Systems

This paper describes a probabilistic framework for studying associations between multiple genotypes, biomarkers, and phenotypic traits in the presence of noise and unobserved confounders for large genetic studies. The framework builds on sparse linear methods developed for regression and modified here for inferring causal structures of richer networks with latent variables. The method is motivated by the use of genotypes as ``instruments'' to infer causal associations between phenotypic biomarkers and outcomes, without making the common restrictive assumptions of instrumental variable methods. The method may be used for an effective screening of potentially interesting genotype phenotype and biomarker-phenotype associations in genome-wide studies, which may have important implications for validating biomarkers as possible proxy endpoints for early stage clinical trials. Where the biomarkers are gene transcripts, the method can be used for fine mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) detected in genetic linkage studies. The method is applied for examining effects of gene transcript levels in the liver on plasma HDL cholesterol levels for a sample of sequenced mice from a heterogeneous stock, with $\sim 10^5$ genetic instruments and $\sim 47 \times 10^3$ gene transcripts.


Predicting Diabetes Using a Machine Learning Approach - DZone Big Data

#artificialintelligence

Diabetes is one of deadliest diseases in the world. It is not only a disease but also a creator of different kinds of diseases like heart attack, blindness, kidney diseases, etc. The normal identifying process is that patients need to visit a diagnostic center, consult their doctor, and sit tight for a day or more to get their reports. Moreover, every time they want to get their diagnosis report, they have to waste their money in vain. But with the rise of Machine Learning approaches we have the ability to find a solution to this issue, we have developed a system using data mining which has the ability to predict whether the patient has diabetes or not.


Causal Falling Rule Lists

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

A causal falling rule list (CFRL) is a sequence of if-then rules that specifies heterogeneous treatment effects, where (i) the order of rules determines the treatment effect subgroup a subject belongs to, and (ii) the treatment effect decreases monotonically down the list. A given CFRL parameterizes a hierarchical bayesian regression model in which the treatment effects are incorporated as parameters, and assumed constant within model-specific subgroups. We formulate the search for the CFRL best supported by the data as a Bayesian model selection problem, where we perform a search over the space of CFRL models, and approximate the evidence for a given CFRL model using standard variational techniques. We apply CFRL to a census wage dataset to identify subgroups of differing wage inequalities between men and women.


A Bayesian Group Sparse Multi-Task Regression Model for Imaging Genetics

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Motivation: Recent advances in technology for brain imaging and high-throughput genotyping have motivated studies examining the influence of genetic variation on brain structure. Wang et al. (Bioinformatics, 2012) have developed an approach for the analysis of imaging genomic studies using penalized multi-task regression with regularization based on a novel group $l_{2,1}$-norm penalty which encourages structured sparsity at both the gene level and SNP level. While incorporating a number of useful features, the proposed method only furnishes a point estimate of the regression coefficients; techniques for conducting statistical inference are not provided. A new Bayesian method is proposed here to overcome this limitation. Results: We develop a Bayesian hierarchical modeling formulation where the posterior mode corresponds to the estimator proposed by Wang et al. (Bioinformatics, 2012), and an approach that allows for full posterior inference including the construction of interval estimates for the regression parameters. We show that the proposed hierarchical model can be expressed as a three-level Gaussian scale mixture and this representation facilitates the use of a Gibbs sampling algorithm for posterior simulation. Simulation studies demonstrate that the interval estimates obtained using our approach achieve adequate coverage probabilities that outperform those obtained from the nonparametric bootstrap. Our proposed methodology is applied to the analysis of neuroimaging and genetic data collected as part of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI), and this analysis of the ADNI cohort demonstrates clearly the value added of incorporating interval estimation beyond only point estimation when relating SNPs to brain imaging endophenotypes.