Goto

Collaborating Authors

Class failure rates at Boston schools up 4.6%, district shares in remote learning update

Boston Herald

Failing grades across four core subjects at Boston Public Schools are up 4.6% compared to last year and the rate of students failing at least one class has also increased, district officials announced in a remote learning update. The first quarter marking period for Boston students in grades 6-12 wrapped up in November and data shows kids are struggling most in social studies with a 6% increase in failing grades. The rate this quarter was 17% compared to 11% this time last year. Not far behind is English language arts, with a 5.7% increase in failures, math with a 3.5% increase and a 3.4% failure increase in science courses. "Consistent with nationwide trends, there has been an increase in course failure rates when comparing to quarter one grades from last year," said Monica Hogan, of the BPS Office of Data and Accountability in a Wednesday night school committee meeting.


Chicago teachers vote to teach from home, defying district

FOX News

A panel of parents give there take on the president's move to reopen schools on'Fox & amp; Friends.' CHICAGO (AP) -- The Chicago Teachers Union said Sunday that its members voted to defy an order to return to the classroom over concerns about COVID-19, setting up a showdown with district officials who have said that refusing to return when ordered would amount to an illegal strike. Chicago Public Schools, which is the nation's third-largest district, wanted roughly 10,000 kindergarten through eighth grade teachers and other staffers to return to school Monday to get ready to welcome back roughly 70,000 students for part-time in-school classes starting Feb. 1. No return date has been set for high school students. The teachers union, though, opposes the plan over concern for the health of its members and called on them to continue teaching from home in defiance of the district's plan. The union said the district's safety plan falls short and that before teachers can return safely to schools, vaccinations would have to be more widespread and different metrics to measure infections would need to be in place.


NYC again delays in-person learning for most students

Boston Herald

New York City has again delayed the start of in-person learning for most of the more than 1 million students in its public school system. Mayor Bill de Blasio announced Thursday that most elementary school students would do remote-only learning until Sept. 29. Middle and high schools would stay remote through Oct. 1. The delay came just days before students across the nation's largest school district were set to resume in-person instruction Monday. Now, only pre-kindergarten students and some other special education students will be going back into physical classrooms next week.


Parents push to restore in-person learning for high-needs students

Boston Herald

Boston parents are pushing to restore in-person instruction for high-needs students after the district recently switched to full remote learning, but some say plans from district are yet to be formed. "The rug was literally just pulled from under these children's feet," said Roxann Harvey, chair of the Boston Special Education Parent Advisory Council. Boston Public Schools abruptly switched to all remote last week as coronavirus rates in the city continue to rise, leaving high-needs students that were previously getting in-person instruction back at home. Harvey said the kids are regressing, and SpedPac is asking the district for a plan to get the students the services they so desperately need. "There's been a lot of disappointment and a lot of hurt. We are moving past it, we want to work with the district and the union to get services for high-needs students," said Harvey.


Chicago teachers vote to teach from home, defying district

Boston Herald

The Chicago Teachers Union said Sunday that its members voted to defy an order to return to the classroom over concerns about COVID-19, setting up a showdown with district officials who have said that refusing to return when ordered would amount to an illegal strike. Chicago Public Schools, which is the nation's third-largest district, wanted roughly 10,000 kindergarten through eighth grade teachers and other staffers to return to school Monday to get ready to welcome back roughly 70,000 students for part-time in-school classes starting Feb. 1. No return date has been set for high school students. The teachers union, though, opposes the plan over concern for the health of its members and called on them to continue teaching from home in defiance of the district's plan. The union said the district's safety plan falls short and that before teachers can return safely to schools, vaccinations would have to be more widespread and different metrics to measure infections would need to be in place. "There's no doubt we all want to return to in-person instruction.