How Europe's New Privacy Law Will Change the Web, and More

WIRED

Consumers have long wondered just what Google and Facebook know about them, and who else can access their personal data. But internet giants have little incentive to give straight answers -- even to simple questions like, "Why am I being shown this ad?" On May 25, however, the power balance will shift towards consumers, thanks to a European privacy law that restricts how personal data is collected and handled. The rule, called General Data Protection Regulation or GDPR, focuses on ensuring that users know, understand, and consent to the data collected about them. Under GDPR, pages of fine print won't suffice.


Seven out of 10 apps share data with third party servers

Daily Mail

Our mobile phones can reveal a lot about ourselves: where we live and work; who our family, friends and acquaintances are; how (and even what) we communicate with them; and our personal habits. With all the information stored on them, it isn't surprising that mobile device users take steps to protect their privacy, like using PINs or passcodes to unlock their phones. The research that we and our colleagues are doing identifies and explores a significant threat that most people miss: More than 70 percent of smartphone apps are reporting personal data to third-party tracking companies like Google Analytics, the Facebook Graph API or Crashlytics. Many mobile apps are written by combining various functions, precoded by other developers and companies, in what are called third-party libraries. When people install a new Android or iOS app, it asks the user's permission before accessing personal information.


Security On Smartphones And Mobile Devices Is At Risk Because Of Apps

International Business Times

Our mobile phones can reveal a lot about ourselves: where we live and work; who our family, friends and acquaintances are; how (and even what) we communicate with them; and our personal habits. With all the information stored on them, it isn't surprising that mobile device users take steps to protect their privacy, like using PINs or passcodes to unlock their phones. The research that we and our colleagues are doing identifies and explores a significant threat that most people miss: More than 70 percent of smartphone apps are reporting personal data to third-party tracking companies like Google Analytics, the Facebook Graph API or Crashlytics. When people install a new Android or iOS app, it asks the user's permission before accessing personal information. Generally speaking, this is positive.


The Multi-Billion Dollar Industry That Makes Its Living From Your Data

#artificialintelligence

In the ocean ecosystem, plankton is the raw material that fuels an entire food chain. These tiny organisms on their own aren't that remarkable, but en masse, they have a huge impact on the world. Here on dry land, the massive volume of content and meta data we produce fuels a marketing research industry that is worth nearly $50 billion. Every instant message, page click, and step you take now produces a data point that can be used to build a detailed profile of who you are. The coarse-grained demographics and contact information of yesteryear seems quaint compared to today's sophisticated data collection battleground.


Vermont, California Charging Ahead of Congress on Data Privacy Laws

Slate

Future Tense is a partnership of Slate, New America, and Arizona State University that examines emerging technologies, public policy, and society. Concerns over data privacy have driven much of the conversation around technology in the first half of 2018, with news of the Cambridge Analytica scandal, the European Union's General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), and the hack of Securus Technologies's location-tracking data. Federal lawmakers have taken notice and say they are considering legislation to better protect citizens' data. For example, Sens. Amy Klobuchar and John Kennedy introduced the Social Media Privacy Protection and Consumer Rights Act of 2018 in April, while Rep. Marsha Blackburn has renewed her push for the Browser Act that she initially proposed in 2017. Yet it's unclear when, or if, any of these bills will get a vote.