AI-powered body scanners could soon speed up your airport check-in

#artificialintelligence

A startup bankrolled by Bill Gates is about to conduct the first public trials of high-speed body scanners powered by artificial intelligence (AI), the Guardian can reveal. According to documents filed with the US Federal Communications Commission (FCC), Boston-based Evolv Technology is planning to test its system at Union Station in Washington DC, in Los Angeles's Union Station metro and at Denver international airport. Evolv uses the same millimetre-wave radio frequencies as the controversial, and painfully slow, body scanners now found at many airport security checkpoints. However, the new device can complete its scan in a fraction of second, using computer vision and machine learning to spot guns and bombs. Homeland Security: 'be patient' as airport lines reach extreme lengths This means passengers can simply walk through a scanning gate without stopping or even slowing down – like the hi-tech scanners seen in the 1990 sci-fi film Total Recall.


AI-powered body scanners could soon speed up your airport check-in

#artificialintelligence

A startup bankrolled by Bill Gates is about to conduct the first public trials of high-speed body scanners powered by artificial intelligence (AI), the Guardian can reveal. According to documents filed with the US Federal Communications Commission (FCC), Boston-based Evolv Technology is planning to test its system at Union Station in Washington DC, in Los Angeles's Union Station metro and at Denver international airport. Evolv uses the same millimetre-wave radio frequencies as the controversial, and painfully slow, body scanners now found at many airport security checkpoints. However, the new device can complete its scan in a fraction of second, using computer vision and machine learning to spot guns and bombs. This means passengers can simply walk through a scanning gate without stopping or even slowing down – like the hi-tech scanners seen in the 1990 sci-fi film Total Recall.


Evolv raises $18 million for body scanners that don't cause long lines at security

#artificialintelligence

For a previous generation in the US, the only places where one might worry about the possibility of a mass casualty were "high-value targets," like airports and government offices, places that have body scanners and bag inspections, security guards and long lines to get in today. But attackers increasingly strike at public places like nightclubs, stadiums, clinics, malls, places of worship and schools. A startup called Evolv Technology Inc., has raised $18 million to help venues with even a limited budget use advanced technology rather than pat downs to detect and prevent mass casualties. Investors in Evolv's new round of funding included General Catalyst, Lux Capital, Gates Ventures, and Data Collective. The Waltham, Mass.-based startup has created both hardware and software for physical security.


Making Facial Recognition Smarter With Artificial Intelligence

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A screen shows a demonstration of the cognitive level of a facial recognition software at the Ericsson AB booth at the Mobile World Congress Shanghai in Shanghai, China, on Thursday, June 28, 2018. The global videos surveillance market is expected to post a compound annual growth rate of close to 11% during the period 2018-2022 according to Technavio. The potential benefits of leveraging artificial intelligence (A) in the physical security industry have pros and cons on both sides, but the debate over the ethical ways to leverage AI and surveillance continues as more and more surveillance systems are getting the brains to match what they see. AI startups like Boulder AI, which offers a vision-as-a-service and IC Realtime, which lets you search and analyze your video feeds from CCTV system; are gaining traction. Alongside the Chinese facial recognition startups like Megvii's Face with $600 million in private equity; SenseTime with $62o million from a series C; and, Yitu Technology with $300 million from a series C, the potential uses of facial recognition technology are well funded.


Can technology protect soft targets against mass shootings and terrorist attacks?

Mashable

Virtually all of these terrorist attacks and mass shootings occurred in what are known as "soft target" locations: big spaces with multiple entries and exits, lots of people, and relatively little protection. Soft targets like airports often contain more stringent security inside, but those security checkpoints, scanners and pat-downs you endure at the TSA are intended to protect the airplanes and their passengers. The rest of the airport terminal generally does not enjoy the same level of security. According to the U.S. Department of Justice, the typical metal detector can scan roughly 15-20 people per minute. A TSA body scanner might handle 30 people per minute.