Traffic lights built into pavement for smartphone-using pedestrians in Netherlands

The Independent - Tech

A town in the Netherlands is trialling special pavement lights designed to help smartphone users cross the road safely. The LED strips have been embedded into the ground at a pedestrian crossing in Bodegraven, close to three schools. The hope is that they'll catch the eye of pedestrians who are too distracted by their smartphones to bother looking at the road, telling them when to cross and when not to cross by either glowing green or red, depending on the traffic light signals. The giant human-like robot bears a striking resemblance to the military robots starring in the movie'Avatar' and is claimed as a world first by its creators from a South Korean robotic company Waseda University's saxophonist robot WAS-5, developed by professor Atsuo Takanishi and Kaptain Rock playing one string light saber guitar perform jam session A man looks at an exhibit entitled'Mimus' a giant industrial robot which has been reprogrammed to interact with humans during a photocall at the new Design Museum in South Kensington, London Electrification Guru Dr. Wolfgang Ziebart talks about the electric Jaguar I-PACE concept SUV before it was unveiled before the Los Angeles Auto Show in Los Angeles, California, U.S The Jaguar I-PACE Concept car is the start of a new era for Jaguar. Japan's On-Art Corp's CEO Kazuya Kanemaru poses with his company's eight metre tall dinosaur-shaped mechanical suit robot'TRX03' and other robots during a demonstration in Tokyo, Japan Japan's On-Art Corp's eight metre tall dinosaur-shaped mechanical suit robot'TRX03' performs during its unveiling in Tokyo, Japan Singulato Motors co-founder and CEO Shen Haiyin poses in his company's concept car Tigercar P0 at a workshop in Beijing, China A picture shows Singulato Motors' concept car Tigercar P0 at a workshop in Beijing, China Connected company president Shigeki Tomoyama addresses a press briefing as he elaborates on Toyota's "connected strategy" in Tokyo.


County-USC patients' personal information stolen in car break-in

Los Angeles Times

Files containing personal information on more than 700 patients treated at Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center were stolen when an employee's car was broken into, county health officials said Monday. The break-in occurred in July. The county Department of Health Services released a statement after trying to notify the affected patients by mail. The files stolen from the car contained appointment lists for people who were treated at the County-USC neurosurgery clinic between May 10 and July 26, according to the statement. The documents did not contain Social Security numbers or financial information, but did include patients' full names, birth dates, telephone numbers and details about their scheduled appointments, including diagnosis information in some cases.


Predicting Car Problems Before They Occur - DZone Big Data

#artificialintelligence

A number of fascinating projects have emerged that aim to use AI to better understand the way vibrations can give us insight into the health (or not) of machinery. A recent paper from the University of Alabama in Huntsville describes a new algorithm that aims to provide a diagnostic function for the mechanical systems that form such a big part of our commercial engine. "The ability to extract dependable and actionable information from the vibration of machines will allow businesses to keep their assets running for longer while spending far less in maintenance. Also, the investment to get there will be just software," the researcher says. A number of companies are deploying this kind of approach in the real world, with German startup KONUX making headway in the railway industry.


CAGE director charged under anti-terrorism law for refusing to hand over passwords to police

The Independent - Tech

The international director of campaign group CAGE has been charged under anti-terror laws, after refusing to surrender his passwords to police. Muhammad Rabbani was arrested last November after handing his laptop and mobile phone to officers but refusing to unlock them, after being stopped and searched at Heathrow Airport. He has now been charged under Schedule 7 of the Terrorism Act 2000. The I.F.O. is fuelled by eight electric engines, which is able to push the flying object to an estimated top speed of about 120mph. The giant human-like robot bears a striking resemblance to the military robots starring in the movie'Avatar' and is claimed as a world first by its creators from a South Korean robotic company Waseda University's saxophonist robot WAS-5, developed by professor Atsuo Takanishi and Kaptain Rock playing one string light saber guitar perform jam session A man looks at an exhibit entitled'Mimus' a giant industrial robot which has been reprogrammed to interact with humans during a photocall at the new Design Museum in South Kensington, London Electrification Guru Dr. Wolfgang Ziebart talks about the electric Jaguar I-PACE concept SUV before it was unveiled before the Los Angeles Auto Show in Los Angeles, California, U.S The Jaguar I-PACE Concept car is the start of a new era for Jaguar.


SAP turns to NTT to add driver data to its connected car analytics system

PCWorld

Safer passengers and healthier drivers might be among the outcomes of a new trial by a German software company and a Japanese telecommunications operator. NTT, the Japanese co-inventor of a sensing fabric used in health-monitoring clothing, is pairing up with business software developer SAP to collect and process real-time data on drivers' heart rate and alertness. SAP already sells a real-time analytics tool, Vehicle Insights, for processing data from connected vehicles. In the trial with NTT it will add information from NTT's IoT analytics platform to the database, allowing the analytics system to look for -- and perhaps act on -- links between drivers' state of health and other vehicle telemetry. The companies will begin a field trial with Keifuku Bus Co. in Fukui, Japan, next month, and hope to begin offering a commercial service -- for data analytics, not public transport -- in the U.S. and Europe early next year.