The out-there AI ideas designed to keep the US ahead of China

MIT Technology Review

When it comes to artificial intelligence, the United States has a tradition of betting on crazy ideas. This week, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) showcased projects that are part of a new five-year, $2 billion plan to foster the next round of out-there concepts that will bring about new advances in AI. These include efforts to give machines common sense; to have them learn faster, using less data; and to create chips that reconfigure themselves to unlock new AI capabilities. Speaking at the event, Michael Kratsios, deputy assistant to the president for technology policy at the White House, said the agency's efforts are a key part of the government's plan to stay ahead in AI. "This administration supports DARPA's commitment, and shares its intense interest in developing and applying artificial intelligence," Kratsios said. President Trump signed an executive order last month to launch the US government's AI strategy, called the American AI Initiative.


The out-there AI ideas designed to keep the US ahead of China

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When it comes to artificial intelligence, the United States has a tradition of betting on crazy ideas. This week, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) showcased projects that are part of a new five-year, $2 billion plan to foster the next round of out-there concepts that will bring about new advances in AI. These include efforts to give machines common sense; to have them learn faster, using less data; and to create chips that reconfigure themselves to unlock new AI capabilities. Speaking at the event, Michael Kratsios, deputy assistant to the president for technology policy at the White House, said the agency's efforts are a key part of the government's plan to stay ahead in AI. "This administration supports DARPA's commitment, and shares its intense interest in developing and applying artificial intelligence," Kratsios said. President Trump signed an executive order last month to launch the US government's AI strategy, called the American AI Initiative.


DARPA wants to teach machines to handle new situations like 'biological systems' do - Fedscoop

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The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency is in the process of spinning up a new research program to develop ways to teach machines to learn while they are operating -- and apply their knowledge to new situations "the way biological systems do." The agency is now accepting research proposals for the program's first funding opportunity via a Broad Agency Announcement, published last week. Dubbed the Lifelong Learning Machines program or L2M, DARPA plans through the four-year program to fund the development of "substantially more capable systems that are continually improving and updating from experience." Artificial intelligence systems today can't adapt to situations for which they were not already trained or programmed, as DARPA notes in its Broad Agency Announcement released last week. And so applying AI systems for military uses in areas like "supply chain, logistics and visual recognition" is difficult to do today, because many of those applications involve details that aren't defined in advance, according to DARPA.


Pentagon Will Spend $2 Billion Developing Next-Generation AI

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The Pentagon on Friday announced it would spend more than $2 billion over the next five years to advance the foundations of artificial intelligence technology. Through the AI Next initiative, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency aims to bring about so-called "third wave" AI, tools capable of human-like communication and contextual reasoning that far surpass the abilities of today's most advanced machine-learning and AI technology. The massive investment comes as global powers like China pour significant resources into their own artificial intelligence R&D programs. "I'm proud to tell you DARPA plans to continue and increase its support for AI research, with a significant focus on the technologies that underpin a third wave of AI," said DARPA Director Steven Walker in the announcement at the agency's 60th anniversary conference. "Let's … double down and commit to ensuring our country continues to create technological surprise for many more years and continues to use that surprise for a better and more secure world."


Look out: Here comes the next wave of smarter, nimbler and more collaborative AI - Digirupt IO

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When many think about the progress of AI and its impact on work, they envision a world where the robots and software thinking machines do all of the work and there's little room left for the work humans used to do. It's certainly not the future for the AI and human workforce that the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) sees. DARPA is the agency that helped usher in the Internet, as well as the original expert systems of the 1960s through 1980s, as well as the big data analysis and machine learning systems that lay the foundation for natural language processing, self-driving cars, personal assistant bots. Now DARPA is leading the efforts to make AI and humans even more collaborative co-workers. AI has proven some of its value in the form of very targeted and specialized systems.