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Can a Robot Invent? The Fight Around AI and Patents Explained

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Patent offices and courts around the world are being asked to tackle a similar question: can an artificial intelligence system qualify as an inventor for a patent? A test case making its way through several countries--from Saudi Arabia to Australia to Brazil--has spurred debate about advancements in artificial intelligence technology and questions about whether patent laws need to be revised to recognize machines as inventors. A judge in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia recently ruled that, under current U.S. law, AI can't be listed as an inventor on a patent. The ruling was in line with what U.S., British, and EU patent officials have concluded. The push to recognize AI as an inventor comes from Ryan Abbott, a University of Surrey law professor, and Stephen Thaler, a computer scientist from Missouri.


In a world first, South Africa grants patent to an artificial intelligence system

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At first glance, a recently granted South African patent relating to a food container based on fractal geometry seems fairly mundane. The innovation in question involves interlocking food containers that are easy for robots to grasp and stack. On closer inspection, the patent is anything but mundane. That's because the inventor is not a human being -- it is an artificial intelligence (AI) system called DABUS. DABUS (which stands for device for the autonomous bootstrapping of unified sentience) is an AI system created by Stephen Thaler, a pioneer in the field of AI and programming.


In a world first, South Africa grants patent to an artificial intelligence system

#artificialintelligence

At first glance, a recently granted South African patent relating to a "food container based on fractal geometry" seems fairly mundane. The innovation in question involves interlocking food containers that are easy for robots to grasp and stack. On closer inspection, the patent is anything but mundane. That's because the inventor is not a human being – it is an artificial intelligence (AI) system called DABUS. DABUS (which stands for "device for the autonomous bootstrapping of unified sentience") is an AI system created by Stephen Thaler, a pioneer in the field of AI and programming.


Magic of the machine: can artificial intelligence invent?

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There is an interesting appeal listed to be heard in the Patents Court in July. Professor Ryan Abbott of Surrey University wants the patent system to acknowledge machines are inventors. As part of the Artificial Inventor Project, he is seeking patents for inventions made by DABUS (pronounced'DA-BUS'). DABUS, a'creativity machine', is a series of neural networks and was created and is owned by Dr Stephen Thaler. DABUS can be provided information on a particular topic in order to independently create inventions.


Backlash grows against decision to grant patent to AI system

#artificialintelligence

At first glance, a recently granted South African patent relating to a "food container based on fractal geometry" seems fairly mundane. The innovation in question involves interlocking food containers that are easy for robots to grasp and stack. On closer inspection, the patent is anything but mundane. That's because the inventor is not a human being – it is an artificial intelligence (AI) system called DABUS. DABUS (which stands for "device for the autonomous bootstrapping of unified sentience") is an AI system created by Stephen Thaler, a pioneer in the field of AI and programming.