Top U.S. spy catcher says China is using LinkedIn to recruit Americans

The Japan Times

WASHINGTON – The United States' top spy catcher said Chinese espionage agencies are using fake LinkedIn accounts to try to recruit Americans with access to government and commercial secrets, and the company should shut them down. William Evanina, the U.S. counter-intelligence chief, said in an interview that intelligence and law enforcement officials have told LinkedIn, owned by Microsoft Corp., about China's "super aggressive" efforts on the site. He said the Chinese campaign includes contacting thousands of LinkedIn members at a time, but he declined to say how many fake accounts U.S. intelligence had discovered, how many Americans may have been contacted and how much success China has had in the recruitment drive. German and British authorities have previously warned their citizens that Beijing is using LinkedIn to try to recruit them as spies. But this is the first time a U.S. official has publicly discussed the challenge in the United States and indicated it is a bigger problem than previously known.


Top U.S. spy catcher says China is using LinkedIn to recruit Americans

The Japan Times

WASHINGTON – The United States' top spy catcher said Chinese espionage agencies are using fake LinkedIn accounts to try to recruit Americans with access to government and commercial secrets, and the company should shut them down. William Evanina, the U.S. counterintelligence chief, said in an interview that intelligence and law enforcement officials have told LinkedIn, owned by Microsoft Corp., about China's "super aggressive" efforts on the site. He said the Chinese campaign includes contacting thousands of LinkedIn members at a time, but he declined to say how many fake accounts U.S. intelligence had discovered, how many Americans may have been contacted and how much success China has had in the recruitment drive. German and British authorities have previously warned their citizens that Beijing is using LinkedIn to try to recruit them as spies. But this is the first time a U.S. official has publicly discussed the challenge in the United States and indicated it is a bigger problem than previously known.


Chinese spy charged with trying to steal America's aviation secrets by recruiting GE Aviation staff

Daily Mail - Science & tech

A Chinese spy who allegedly attempted to steal trade secrets from multiple US aviation and aerospace companies has been charged. Yanjun Xu, a senior officer with China's Ministry of State Security (MSS) was lured to Belgium by FBI agents who then transferred him to the US for prosecution on economic espionage charges. The Justice Department said Xu had plotted since 2013 to obtain trade secrets from GE Aviation and other companies. GE Aviation's aircraft engine technology was the target of a Chinese espionage operation, according to the US Department of Justice Xu allegedly ran a five-year operation trying to steal trade secrets from Ohio-based GE Aviation - one of the world's leading aircraft engine manufacturers - and other aviation companies, including US military suppliers. He sought to recruit sources in and around the company and bring them to China, to woo their support and gain inside information on GE's technology.


People Are Looking At Your LinkedIn Profile. They Might Be Chinese Spies

NPR Technology

The head of the Justice Department's National Security Division says it's also the biggest counterintelligence threat. The head of the Justice Department's National Security Division says it's also the biggest counterintelligence threat. One of America's most recent espionage cases started with a friendly hello over the Internet. It ended with a jury in Virginia finding former CIA officer Kevin Mallory guilty of spying for China. The Mallory case -- a rare counterintelligence investigation to go to trial -- provides a lesson in how Chinese spies use social media to try to recruit or co-opt Americans.


China, Russia and Iran economic spying on U.S. rampant: report

The Japan Times

WASHINGTON – A Chinese cyberespionage group called APT10 relentlessly attacks U.S. engineering, telecom and aerospace industries. Russian hackers last year compromised dozens of U.S. energy companies. Iranian hackers known as "Rocket Kitten" repeatedly target American defense companies in hopes of stealing information to boost Tehran's missile and space programs. While Moscow's efforts to meddle in the 2016 U.S. presidential election are widely known, spy services from China, Russia and Iran, along with their proxy hackers, also are hard at work trying to steal trade secrets and proprietary information from the United States, according to a government report released Thursday. A classified version of the report was sent to Congress.