Goto

Collaborating Authors

Norwegian robot learns to self-evolve and 3D print itself in the lab

#artificialintelligence

Experts at the University of Oslo, Norway have discovered a new way for robots to design, evolve and manufacture themselves, without input from humans, using a form of artificial evolution called "Generative design," and 3D printers – although admittedly the team, for now at least, still has to assemble the final product, robot, when it's printed. Generative design is something we've talked about several times before and it's where artificial intelligence programs – creative machines, if you will – not humans, innovate new products – such as chairs and even Under Armour's new Architech sneakers. The labs latest robot, "Number Four," which is made up of sausage like plastic parts linked together with servo motors, is trying out different gaits, attempting to figure out the best way to move from one end of the floor to the other. And while you might look at this video and think it's weird, or funny remember that this is just the start. Today it's evolving, trying to learn how to move from A to B in the most efficient manner, but tomorrow – well, it could be "evolving" anything, and all at a much faster rate than humans.


Creating robots capable of moral reasoning is like parenting – Regina Rini Aeon Essays

#artificialintelligence

Intelligent machines, long promised and never delivered, are finally on the horizon. Sufficiently intelligent robots will be able to operate autonomously from human control. They will be able to make genuine choices. And if a robot can make choices, there is a real question about whether it will make moral choices. But what is moral for a robot? Is this the same as what's moral for a human? Philosophers and computer scientists alike tend to focus on the difficulty of implementing subtle human morality in literal-minded machines. But there's another problem, one that really ought to come first. It's the question of whether we ought to try to impose our own morality on intelligent machines at all. In fact, I'd argue that doing so is likely to be counterproductive, and even unethical. The real problem of robot morality is not the robots, but us. Can we handle sharing the world with a new type of moral creature? We like to imagine that artificial intelligence (AI) will be similar to humans, because we are the only advanced intelligence we know. But we are probably wrong.


To Root Artificial Intelligence Deeply in Basic Science for a New Generation of AI

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

One of the ambitions of artificial intelligence is to root artificial intelligence deeply in basic science while developing brain-inspired artificial intelligence platforms that will promote new scientific discoveries. The challenges are essential to push artificial intelligence theory and applied technologies research forward. This paper presents the grand challenges of artificial intelligence research for the next 20 years which include:~(i) to explore the working mechanism of the human brain on the basis of understanding brain science, neuroscience, cognitive science, psychology and data science; (ii) how is the electrical signal transmitted by the human brain? What is the coordination mechanism between brain neural electrical signals and human activities? (iii)~to root brain-computer interface~(BCI) and brain-muscle interface~(BMI) technologies deeply in science on human behaviour; (iv)~making research on knowledge-driven visual commonsense reasoning~(VCR), develop a new inference engine for cognitive network recognition~(CNR); (v)~to develop high-precision, multi-modal intelligent perceptrons; (vi)~investigating intelligent reasoning and fast decision-making systems based on knowledge graph~(KG). We believe that the frontier theory innovation of AI, knowledge-driven modeling methodologies for commonsense reasoning, revolutionary innovation and breakthroughs of the novel algorithms and new technologies in AI, and developing responsible AI should be the main research strategies of AI scientists in the future.


Intelligent Robots Must Uphold Human Rights

AITopics Original Links

There is a strong possibility that in the not-too-distant future, artificial intelligences (AIs), perhaps in the form of robots, will become capable of sentient thought. Whatever form it takes, this dawning of machine consciousness is likely to have a substantial impact on human society. Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates and physicist Stephen Hawking have in recent months warned of the dangers of intelligent robots becoming too powerful for humans to control. The ethical conundrum of intelligent machines and how they relate to humans has long been a theme of science fiction, and has been vividly portrayed in films such as 1982's Blade Runner and this year's Ex Machina. Academic and fictional analyses of AIs tend to focus on human–robot interactions, asking questions such as: would robots make our lives easier?


Intelligent robots must uphold human rights

AITopics Original Links

There is a strong possibility that in the not-too-distant future, artificial intelligences (AIs), perhaps in the form of robots, will become capable of sentient thought. Whatever form it takes, this dawning of machine consciousness is likely to have a substantial impact on human society. Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates and physicist Stephen Hawking have in recent months warned of the dangers of intelligent robots becoming too powerful for humans to control. The ethical conundrum of intelligent machines and how they relate to humans has long been a theme of science fiction, and has been vividly portrayed in films such as 1982's Blade Runner and this year's Ex Machina. Academic and fictional analyses of AIs tend to focus on human–robot interactions, asking questions such as: would robots make our lives easier?