Goto

Collaborating Authors

Death in West Virginia Is 21st Caused by Takata Air Bags

U.S. News

A 56-year-old West Virginia man is the 21st person to die worldwide due to exploding Takata air bag inflators. Steve Mollohan was driving a 2006 Ford Ranger when he was involved in a relatively minor crash and died July 1, an attorney for his family said. Ford said it was notified of the death Dec. 22 and inspected the vehicle Dec. 27. Nineteen auto and truck makers are recalling up to 69 million inflators in the U.S. and 100 million worldwide because they can explode with too much force and hurl shrapnel at drivers and passengers.


Death in Louisiana Is 20th Caused by Takata Air Bags

U.S. News

An unidentified person in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, is the 20th to die worldwide due to exploding Takata air bag inflators. The person was driving a 2004 Honda Civic when the crash occurred on July 10, 2017, according to Honda. The inflator apparently had been salvaged from a 2002 Civic and was among the most dangerous made by the company. Nineteen auto and truck makers are recalling up to 69 million inflators in the U.S. and 100 million worldwide because they can explode with too much force and hurl shrapnel at drivers and passengers.


Briefing – AI, machine learning and cars

#artificialintelligence

Not so long ago, the consumer electronics show (CES) was the place to exhibit the latest in computers, mobile devices and other electronic gadgets. It still is although the accent is changing. Every year, this Las Vegas tech fest attracts a rising tide of automotive suppliers taking space both inside and outside the convention centre halls. This month's management briefing turns the spotlight on some of those exhibitors operating in the brave new auto world of voice control, artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning. Among those unveiling autonomous driving concepts at CES included Chrysler, Toyota, Honda and Faraday Future.


Texas girl, 17, driving recalled, but unfixed, Honda 10th in U.S. to die from Takata air bag flaw

The Japan Times

WASHINGTON/DETROIT – A 17-year-old driver of a recalled 2002 Honda Civic was killed last month after a Takata Corp. air bag ruptured during a rear-end crash, Honda Motor Co. and U.S. regulators said on Wednesday, the 10th U.S. death linked to a defect that has prompted recalls of tens of millions of vehicles worldwide. The latest death took place on March 31 in Fort Bend County, Texas. Honda said the owner had been mailed multiple recall notices about the five-year-old recall effort, but repairs were never made. The driver was not excessively speeding and was wearing her seat belt, he said, saying the crash resulted in moderate damage to her car. "Everybody should have walked away from this," Beckwith said in an interview.


Teenage girl killed by exploding Takata air bag in Texas

FOX News

An exploding Takata air bag has claimed another life, this time a 17-year-old girl whose car crashed near Houston. The girl is the latest victim of malfunctioning air bag inflators that have killed 10 people in the U.S. and another in Malaysia, touching off the largest automotive recall in U.S. history. More than 100 people have been hurt by the inflators, which can explode with too much force, blowing apart a metal canister and sending shards into drivers and passengers. The girl, from Richmond, Texas, was driving a 2002 Honda Civic in Fort Bend County, Texas, when the car rear-ended another vehicle and the air bags went off, said Sheriff's Deputy Danny Beckworth, who investigated the crash. Shrapnel hit the girl's neck, killing her, said Beckworth, who has not yet determined how fast her car was going.