New face of the £50 note is revealed

#artificialintelligence

Computer pioneer and codebreaker Alan Turing will feature on the new design of the Bank of England's £50 note. He is celebrated for his code-cracking work that proved vital to the Allies in World War Two. The £50 note will be the last of the Bank of England collection to switch from paper to polymer when it enters circulation by the end of 2021. The note was once described as the "currency of corrupt elites" and is the least used in daily transactions. However, there are still 344 million £50 notes in circulation, with a combined value of £17.2bn, according to the Bank of England's banknote circulation figures.


New face of the £50 note is revealed

#artificialintelligence

Computer pioneer and codebreaker Alan Turing will feature on the new design of the Bank of England's £50 note. He is celebrated for his code-cracking work that proved vital to the Allies in World War Two. The £50 note will be the last of the Bank of England collection to switch from paper to polymer when it enters circulation by the end of 2021. The note was once described as the "currency of corrupt elites" and is the least used in daily transactions. However, there are still 344 million £50 notes in circulation, with a combined value of £17.2bn, according to the Bank of England's banknote circulation figures.


Alan Turing, codebreaker and mathematician, to be face of Britain's new 50 pound note

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Mark Carney, governor of the Bank of England, speaks in front of the concept design for the new Bank of England fifty pound banknote, featuring mathematician and scientist Alan Turing, during the presentation at the Science and Industry Museum in Manchester, north-west England on July 15, 2019. Alan Turing, a mathematician and codebreaker who deciphered German World War II messages, will appear on Britain's new 50 pound note. The Bank of England made the announcement Monday that Turing, who died in 1954, would appear on the currency and some of his work would also adorn the note. The action continues the posthumous accolades for the scientist, who after the war was charged with gross indecency after admitting to having a homosexual relationship, which was illegal at the time in Britain. To avoid imprisonment, he chose chemical castration with female hormones.


Bank of England picks gay World War II code-breaker Alan Turing for new £50 bank note

The Japan Times

MANCHESTER, ENGLAND - Mathematician Alan Turing, whose cracking of a Nazi code helped the Allies to win World War II but who committed suicide after being convicted for homosexuality, will appear on the Bank of England's new £50 banknote, the central bank said Monday. "As the father of computer science and artificial intelligence, as well as war hero, Alan Turing's contributions were far-ranging and path-breaking," BoE Gov. Mark Carney, who took the final decision on the character selection, said. "Turing is a giant on whose shoulders so many now stand." Turing's electro-mechanical machine, a forerunner of modern computers, unraveled the Enigma code used by Nazi Germany and helped give the Allies an advantage in the naval struggle for control of the Atlantic. His work at Bletchley Park, Britain's wartime code-breaking center, was credited with shortening the war and saving many thousands of lives.


Amazing video gives a 'unique' look inside an Enigma cipher machine

Daily Mail - Science & tech

A fascinating new video gives a unique look inside the Enigma cipher machine used by the Nazis during World War Two and famously cracked by a team of code breakers led by British mathematician Alan Turing. Scientists used state-of-the-art X-ray scans to peer inside the Enigma's metal casing, revealing the wiring and rotors that encrypted the messages sent using the machine. In total, more than 1,500 scans were taken of an Enigma machine built in Berlin in 1941 - one of just 274 known to have survived the war. Enigmas, which resembled large typewriters, were used by German air, naval and army forces to safely send messages throughout the Second World War. It used a complex series of rotors and lights to encrypt messages by swapping letters around via an ever-changing'enigma code'.