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More states join lawsuit to keep 3D-printed gun plans off the internet

Engadget

On August 1st, Defense Distributed was set to upload designs of 3D-printed guns for the public to buy and download. But the day before, a Seattle judge temporarily blocked their release after seven states and Washington, DC sued the company and State Department. Today, eleven more states have joined the legal battle to stop the firearm plans from being sold online. According to the filing, amended complaint added California, Colorado, Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, North Carolina, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Virginia to the list of states Attorneys General opposing the release of the files. Per the Brady Campaign and Center to Prevent Gun Violence, the preliminary injunction hearing has been scheduled for August 21st and the temporary restraining order has been extended until August 28th.


Abolish the #TechToPrisonPipeline

#artificialintelligence

The authors of the Harrisburg University study make explicit their desire to provide "a significant advantage for law enforcement agencies and other intelligence agencies to prevent crime" as a co-author and former NYPD police officer outlined in the original press release.[38] At a time when the legitimacy of the carceral state, and policing in particular, is being challenged on fundamental grounds in the United States, there is high demand in law enforcement for research of this nature, research which erases historical violence and manufactures fear through the so-called prediction of criminality. Publishers and funding agencies serve a crucial role in feeding this ravenous maw by providing platforms and incentives for such research. The circulation of this work by a major publisher like Springer would represent a significant step towards the legitimation and application of repeatedly debunked, socially harmful research in the real world. To reiterate our demands, the review committee must publicly rescind the offer for publication of this specific study, along with an explanation of the criteria used to evaluate it. Springer must issue a statement condemning the use of criminal justice statistics to predict criminality and acknowledging their role in incentivizing such harmful scholarship in the past. Finally, all publishers must refrain from publishing similar studies in the future.


Apple owes $7 billion in royalty payments, Qualcomm claims

ZDNet

Qualcomm claims that Apple owes $7 billion in patent licensing fees amidst a lengthy battle between royalty demands and patent infringement allegations. In a hearing taking place in a federal court in San Diego on Friday, as reported by Reuters, Qualcomm representatives announced the alleged figure owing, while Apple disrupted the amount. In June 2017, the iPad and iPhone maker filed a complaint in a federal court based in the Southern District of California which alleged that Qualcomm was operating an "illegal business model." Cupertino, Calif.-based Apple claimed that Qualcomm charges a fee for each iPhone manufactured, a range of devices which utilizes Qualcomm patents. While this isn't necessarily a problem, Apple says that Qualcomm is doubling its profit by also charging a fee for the technology itself.


MWC 2019: AT&T says customers love 5GE

ZDNet

AT&T is standing by its 5GE branding, saying that it is right to communicate to customers when they are in a faster zone. Speaking during Mobile World Congress (MWC) 2019 in Barcelona, AT&T Business CEO Thaddeus Arroyo told ZDNet that 5GE is distinct from the carrier's 5G service. "I think if you look at 5GE, and this is the evolution platform that we've created and then that will become the foundation upon which we build 5G, these are two separate platforms," Arroyo said. "So what's important for us is when a customer is in a 5GE environment, which ultimately provides them access to faster speeds when they have the right device. When they have the right network, we want them to know they're in an environment that's going to perform better. AT&T's 5GE messaging lets customers know when their compatible device is in a 5G Evolution area, providing speeds and coverage that all other carriers are calling LTE Advanced. The 5GE branding caused an uproar among its rival carriers, with Sprint even filing a lawsuit earlier this month claiming that it is false and misleading, and is causing Sprint to lose revenue. Read also: Did AT&T trick your business into paying for fake 5G? Sprint lawsuit says yes (TechRepublic) T-Mobile -- which plans to merge with Sprint this year -- likewise mocked AT&T's 5GE branding last month, while Verizon CTO Kyle Malady criticised the move. AT&T announced its 5G network going live in mid-December in parts of Dallas, Houston, San Antonio, Waco, Atlanta, Charlotte, Indianapolis, Jacksonville, Louisville, Oklahoma City, New Orleans, and Raleigh. In the first half of 2019, it will also be switched on across Los Angeles, San Diego, San Francisco, San Jose, Las Vegas, Orlando, and Nashville, as well as in Chicago and Minneapolis. Arroyo said AT&T is working with Samsung, Nokia, and Ericsson on providing the tech behind its 5G deployments. CTO Andre Fuetsch this week told ZDNet that AT&T will be bringing Samsung's 5G smartphones onto the network later this year, as well as its existing home broadband Nighthawk router. The chief technology officer also spoke on how the 5G Massive MIMO antennas could actually open up new enterprise and Internet of Things (IoT) opportunities thanks to more precise location data. "What's really unique about that technology that we'll be deploying is it has characteristics such as beamforming, which allows us ... [to] send a stream directly to your device," Fuetsch said. "It actually allows you to know exactly where that device is, and so now you've just kind of opened up this whole new world of very precise location, and that's something we've never been able to do before.


How potentially dangerous fake Apple products reach the US consumer market

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Apple is filing lawsuits in response to several reports of fake Apple products. A customer holds an Apple Lightning to 3.5 mm headphone jack adapter for his iPhone 7 Plus smartphone at the Apple Store on Michigan Avenue in Chicago. A three-story brick building in a low-crime Brooklyn neighborhood in New York City was the first U.S. stop on an international route used to ship thousands of potentially dangerous counterfeit Apple electronics to America's consumer market. The knockoff power adapters and chargers, which Apple says could cause electrical shocks, allegedly traveled from a manufacturer in Hong Kong to Amazon.com, with stopping points at the Brooklyn location and New Jersey electronics companies. U.S. investigators said they have seized multiple imports of suspected counterfeits that had been routed to the Brooklyn location.