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Measuring Trust in Artificial Intelligence (AI)

#artificialintelligence

Prompted by the increasing prominence of artificial intelligence (AI) in society, University of Tokyo researchers investigated public attitudes toward the ethics of AI. Their findings quantify how different demographics and ethical scenarios affect these attitudes. As part of this study, the team developed an octagonal visual metric, analogous to a rating system, which could be useful to AI researchers who wish to know how their work may be perceived by the public. Many people feel the rapid development of technology often outpaces that of the social structures that implicitly guide and regulate it, such as law or ethics. AI in particular exemplifies this as it has become so pervasive in everyday life for so many, seemingly overnight.


Artificial Intelligence (AI) Trust Measurement » Brinkwire

#artificialintelligence

Public trust in AI varies greatly depending on the application, according to researchers. The rise of artificial intelligence (AI) in society prompted University of Tokyo researchers to investigate public attitudes toward AI ethics. Their findings quantify how different demographics and ethical scenarios influence these attitudes. The team developed an octagonal visual metric, similar to a rating system, as part of this research, which could be useful to AI researchers who want to know how their work is perceived by the general public. Many people believe that technology's rapid advancement outpaces that of the social structures that implicitly guide and regulate it, such as law and ethics.


Measuring Trust in Artificial Intelligence (AI)

#artificialintelligence

Researchers find public trust in AI varies greatly depending on the application. Prompted by the increasing prominence of artificial intelligence (AI) in society, University of Tokyo researchers investigated public attitudes toward the ethics of AI. Their findings quantify how different demographics and ethical scenarios affect these attitudes. As part of this study, the team developed an octagonal visual metric, analogous to a rating system, which could be useful to AI researchers who wish to know how their work may be perceived by the public. Many people feel the rapid development of technology often outpaces that of the social structures that implicitly guide and regulate it, such as law or ethics.


Population Wide Attitude Diffusion in Community Structured Graphs

AAAI Conferences

Understanding population wide attitude change is an important step to understanding the behavior of societies. In this talk, we will study population wide attitude change through the use of computational models. Using a model based on parallel constraint satisfaction, we will show how varying parameters, such as cognitive effort, and community structure, can impact attitude change in populations.


Mitra

AAAI Conferences

The anti-vaccination movement threatens public health by reducing the likelihood of disease eradication. With social media's purported role in disseminating anti-vaccine information, it is imperative to understand the drivers of attitudes among participants involved in the vaccination debate on a communication channel critical to the movement: Twitter. Using four years of longitudinal data capturing vaccine discussions on Twitter, we identify users who persistently hold pro and anti attitudes, and those who newly adopt anti attitudes towards vaccination. After gathering each user's entire Twitter timeline, totaling to over 3 million tweets, we explore differences in the individual narratives across the user cohorts. We find that those with long-term anti-vaccination attitudes manifest conspiratorial thinking, mistrust in government, and are resolute and in-group focused in language. New adoptees appear to be predisposed to form anti-vaccination attitudes via similar government distrust and general paranoia, but are more social and less certain than their long-term counterparts. We discuss how this apparent predisposition can interact with social media-fueled events to bring newcomers into the anti-vaccination movement. Given the strong base of conspiratorial thinking underlying anti-vaccination attitudes, we conclude by highlighting the need for alternatives to traditional methods of using authoritative sources such as the government when correcting misleading vaccination claims.