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They Should Know How We Feel! Using AI to Measure Our Psychology (with Daniel McDuff)

#artificialintelligence

During my last interview I had a great talk with Daniel McDuff. Daniel's research is at the intersection of psychology and computer science. He is interested in designing hardware and algorithms for sensing human behavior at scale, and in building technologies that make life better. Applications of behavior sensing that he is most excited about are in: understanding mental health, improving online learning and designing new connected devices (IoT). Listen to more about why it is important to collect data from much larger scales and help computers read our emotional state. Key Learning Points: 1. Understanding the impact, intersection, and meaning of Psychology and Computer Science 2. Facial Expression Recognition 3. How to define Artificial Intelligence, Deep Learning, and Machine Learning 4. Applications of behavior sensing with Online Learning, Health, and Connected Devices 5. Visual Wearable sensors and heart health 6. The impact of education and learning 7. How to build computers to measure phycology, our reactions, emotions, etc 8. Daniel is building and utilizing scalable computer vision and machine learning tools to enable the automated recognition and analysis of emotions and physiology. He is currently Director of Research at Affectiva, a post-doctoral research affiliate at the MIT Media Lab and a visiting scientist at Brigham and Womens Hospital. At Affectiva Daniel is building state-of-the-art facial expression recognition software and leading analysis of the world's largest database of human emotion responses. Daniel completed his PhD in the Affective Computing Group at the MIT Media Lab in 2014 and has a B.A. and Masters from Cambridge University. His work has received nominations and awards from Popular Science magazine as one of the top inventions in 2011, South-by-South-West Interactive (SXSWi), The Webby Awards, ESOMAR, the Center for Integrated Medicine and Innovative Technology (CIMIT) and several IEEE conferences. His work has been reported in many publications including The Times, the New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, BBC News, New Scientist and Forbes magazine. Daniel has been named a 2015 WIRED Innovation Fellow.


An end to ID theft? This facial recognition is so smart even twins can't fool it

ZDNet

With, left, Estonian e-residency project head Kaspar Korjus, Veriff CEO Kaarel Kotkas: "There are some differences that a human eye could miss, but the algorithm won't." In the spring last year, Kaarel Kotkas was finishing his high-school studies at the Tallinn Secondary School of Science. Around that time he was approached by billion-dollar startup TransferWise, which has its development hub in Estonia. "We've heard great things about you. Could we meet up and discuss a few opportunities for cooperation?"


A 20-Year Community Roadmap for Artificial Intelligence Research in the US

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Decades of research in artificial intelligence (AI) have produced formidable technologies that are providing immense benefit to industry, government, and society. AI systems can now translate across multiple languages, identify objects in images and video, streamline manufacturing processes, and control cars. The deployment of AI systems has not only created a trillion-dollar industry that is projected to quadruple in three years, but has also exposed the need to make AI systems fair, explainable, trustworthy, and secure. Future AI systems will rightfully be expected to reason effectively about the world in which they (and people) operate, handling complex tasks and responsibilities effectively and ethically, engaging in meaningful communication, and improving their awareness through experience. Achieving the full potential of AI technologies poses research challenges that require a radical transformation of the AI research enterprise, facilitated by significant and sustained investment. These are the major recommendations of a recent community effort coordinated by the Computing Community Consortium and the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence to formulate a Roadmap for AI research and development over the next two decades.


Machines Learn Appearance Bias in Face Recognition

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

We seek to determine whether state-of-the-art, black box face recognition techniques can learn first-impression appearance bias from human annotations. With FaceNet, a popular face recognition architecture, we train a transfer learning model on human subjects' first impressions of personality traits in other faces. We measure the extent to which this appearance bias is embedded and benchmark learning performance for six different perceived traits. In particular, we find that our model is better at judging a person's dominance based on their face than other traits like trustworthiness or likeability, even for emotionally neutral faces. We also find that our model tends to predict emotions for deliberately manipulated faces with higher accuracy than for randomly generated faces, just like a human subject. Our results lend insight into the manner in which appearance biases may be propagated by standard face recognition models.