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IBM Doubles Its Quantum Computing Power Again

#artificialintelligence

IBM announced at CES 2020 that its newest 28-qubit quantum computer, Raleigh, achieved the company's goal of doubling its Quantum Volume (IBM names its systems by city names). Raleigh reached a Quantum Volume of 32 this year, up from 16 last year. Raleigh draws on an improved hexagonal lattice connectivity structure developed in IBM's 53-qubit quantum computer, and features improved coherence aspects. According to IBM, the lattice connectivity had an impact on reduced gate errors and exposure to crosstalk. IBM has doubled its systems' Quantum Volume every year since 2017, when it first demonstrated a Quantum Volume of 4 with its five-qubit computer called Tenerite.


Intel's quest to build the world's first true quantum computer

New Scientist

Intel is taking a slow and steady approach to quantum computing. Competitors like Google may be racing to achieve so-called quantum supremacy, in which a quantum computer outperforms an ordinary one. But Intel's James Clarke has bigger ideas. He leads the firm's quantum computing research team, and says it is looking past near-term goals in order to be the first to make a device with a million qubits, or quantum bits – enough to have a real impact on the world.


IBM reveals quantum computing breakthrough

Daily Mail - Science & tech

IBM has announced a milestone in its race against Google and other big tech firms to build a powerful quantum computer. Dario Gil, who leads IBM's quantum computing and artificial intelligence research division, said Friday that the company's scientists have successfully built and measured a processor prototype with 50 quantum bits, known as qubits. Gil says it's the first time any company has built a quantum computer at this scale. IBM scientists have successfully built and measured a processor prototype with 50 quantum bits, known as qubits, the first time any company has built a quantum computer at this scale. The heart of modern computing is binary code, which has served computers for decades.


Everyone is jumping on the quantum computing bandwagon, but why?

New Scientist

Quantum computing is booming, but is it a bubble? At a gathering of experts on this technology in California last week, nobody seemed to know how, or even if, it will turn out to be useful. The race for quantum supremacy may be over, but the race for a useful quantum computer is still on.


IBM will soon launch a 53-qubit quantum computer – TechCrunch

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IBM continues to push its quantum computing efforts forward and today announced that it will soon make a 53-qubit quantum computer available to clients of its IBM Q Network. The new system, which is scheduled to go online in the middle of next month, will be the largest universal quantum computer available for external use yet. The new machine will be part of IBM's new Quantum Computation Center in New York State, which the company also announced today. The new center, which is essentially a data center for IBM's quantum machines, will also feature five 20-qubit machines, but that number will grow to 14 within the next month. IBM promises a 95% service availability for its quantum machines.