Navy to test 'ghost fleet' attack drone boats in war scenarios

FOX News

File photo - An unmanned 11-meter rigid-hull inflatable boat from Naval Surface Warfare Center Carderock operates autonomously during an Office of Naval Research-sponsored demonstration of swarmboat technology on the James River in Newport News, Va.(U.S. Navy photo by John F. Williams/Released) The U.S. Navy will launch a swarm of interconnected small attack drone boats on mock-combat missions to refine command and control technology and prepare its "Ghost Fleet" of autonomous, yet networked surface craft for war. Developed by the Office of Naval Research and Naval Sea Systems Command, "Ghost Fleet" represents a Navy strategy to surveil, counter, overwhelm and attack enemies in a coordinated fashion - all while keeping sailors on host ships at safer distances. The small boats, many of them called Unmanned Surface Vessels, are designed to conduct ISR missions, find and destroy mines and launch a range of attacks including electronic warfare and even mounted guns. The concept is to use advanced computer algorithms bringing new levels of autonomy to surface warfare, enabling ships to coordinate information exchange, operate in tandem without colliding and launch combined assaults. "Ghost Fleet is really helping us in the Command and Control and coms arena. The demonstration will allow us to learn lessons about integrated payloads with USVs," Capt.


US Navy building robotic 'drone battleships' that can launch from the air and sea to protect coast

Daily Mail - Science & tech

The US Navy and researchers from Florida Atlantic University have revealed plans to develop autonomous robotic'drone battleships' that can launch underwater and aerial attacks in order to protect US coasts. Last month, FAU was awarded $1.25 million by US Navy for research for unmanned marine vehicle platforms. The five-year project will undertake research in support of autonomous marine vehicle platforms for coastal surveillance, coastal surveys, target tracking and protection of at-sea assets. The US Navy and researchers from Florida Atlantic University are developing'motherships' that can launch aerial and underwater drones to protect the coast'Our focus will be on developing a multi-vehicle system that can safely and reliably navigate coastal waters with a high level of autonomy while performing assigned tasks,' said Manhar Dhanak, director of SeaTech, the Institute for Ocean and Systems Engineering in FAU's Department of Ocean and Mechanical Engineering. The researchers plan to develop new software to better improve multi-sensors and collision avoidance, as well as simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM).



The technology that will help warships rule the waves

AITopics Original Links

They are the ultimate symbol of military might, capable of providing a dominant presence in almost any region of the world where there is a nearby ocean. But as technology has advanced, the hulking weaponry and armour of warships that have ruled the waves are having to change and adapt to these high-tech times. From drones to unmanned boats and laser weapons, experts at How It Works Magazine have revealed what fleets of the future will look like. From drones to unmanned boats and laser weapons, experts at How It Works Magazine have revealed what fleets of the future will look like. This artist's impression shows a selection of some of the features that could make their way onto warships over the next decade The Royal Navy in the UK has been challenging young British scientists and engineers to design the fleet of the future.


US self driving stealth ship to be get more missiles

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Dubbed the'Sea Hunter', the 132ft ship is designed to travel thousands of miles out at sea without a single crew member on board. Now, the 132-foot Sea Hunter trimaran, is set to get an upgrade - turning it into a stealthy killing machine. The Navy has revealed plans to expand the mission portfolio of the craft so that it can conduct surface warfare missions, fire weapons and launch electronic attacks. The 132ft-long (40-metre) unarmed prototype, dubbed Sea Hunter, is the naval equivalent of Google's self-driving car, designed to cruise on the ocean's surface without a crew. The ship's projected $20 million (£14.2 million) price tag and its $20,000 (£14,300) daily operating cost make it relatively inexpensive for the navy The 132ft-long (40-metre) unarmed prototype, dubbed Sea Hunter, is the naval equivalent of Google's self-driving car, designed to cruise on the ocean's surface without a crew.