California Lawmakers Advance Bill To Redefine And Protect Gig Workers

NPR Technology

Democratic Assemblywoman Lorena Gonzalez speaks at a July rally for independent contractors in Sacramento, Calif. The measure that passed Tuesday in the state Senate requires companies such as Lyft and Uber to turn many of its contract workers into full employees. Democratic Assemblywoman Lorena Gonzalez speaks at a July rally for independent contractors in Sacramento, Calif. The measure that passed Tuesday in the state Senate requires companies such as Lyft and Uber to turn many of its contract workers into full employees. Lawmakers in California have advanced a bill aimed at ensuring minimum wage, workers' compensation and other benefits for contract workers in the gig economy.


California lawmakers consider bill that would 'lead the world' on gig worker rights

The Guardian

California legislators are set to decide on legislation that would fundamentally change the way tech giants like Lyft and Uber engage with workers. Assembly Bill 5 would change the way businesses classify employees and dramatically expand protections for gig workers. If it passes, the legislation would represent a big win for labor advocates across the state. "This bill not only does important things immediately for workers, but also sets a framework for the future we think is really important," said Steve Smith of the California Labor Federation. AB5 passed California's state assembly 53-11 in May and has since moved to the state senate's appropriations committee for a vote on Friday.


California law on treating rideshare drivers as employees may hurt 'gig economy'

The Japan Times

WASHINGTON – Labor activists Wednesday were celebrating California's move to have drivers treated as employees by rideshare firms even as it fueled concerns it will hurt digital platforms depending on the "gig economy." A landmark bill was approved 29-11 late Tuesday in the state senate, with the assembly -- which has already approved the measure -- expected to send it to California Gov. Gavin Newsom. The legislation, which is being closely watched in other states, responds to critics who argue that companies like Uber and Lyft shortchange drivers by denying them employee benefits. The law, if enacted, challenges the business model of the rideshare platforms and others that depend on workers taking on "gigs" as independent contractors. "This is a huge win for workers across the nation!"


Are you an employee or a contractor? Carpenters, strippers and dog walkers now face that question

Los Angeles Times

When Kristyn Hansen first took a job at Stews Barber Shop, she cut hair nine hours a day, three days a week. She earned no overtime pay, had no mandated breaks, and her Ladera Ranch bosses didn't cover Social Security taxes, unemployment or disability insurance. That's because Hansen, 32, was classified as an independent contractor. "I loved it," she recalls. The schedule allowed her to take five classes at a local college.


As more Uber drivers hit the road in California, a state lawmaker wants to try again to let them unionize

Los Angeles Times

Uber drivers are classified as independent contractors, which the company defends as accurate. A San Diego assemblywoman hopes to introduce legislation to allow them to organize and advocate for their pay and benefits while preserving their work flexibility. Uber drivers are classified as independent contractors, which the company defends as accurate. A San Diego assemblywoman hopes to introduce legislation to allow them to organize and advocate for their pay and benefits while preserving their work flexibility. High-profile lawsuits and legislation have failed to answer a question that has loomed over ride-hailing giants Uber and Lyft even as more Californians have decided to drive for the companies: Just whom do the drivers work for?