Do L.A. Unified's daily random searches keep students safe, or do they go too far?

Los Angeles Times

The nonprofit InnerCity Struggle, which works to promote safe, healthy communities on L.A.'s Eastside, and the advocacy law firm Public Counsel asked the district for logs of random searches at schools where weapons had been confiscated. The district provided them with logs for 59 schools, fewer than a quarter of the middle and high schools. The records may not show all the searches at those 59 schools because they asked for logs only when weapons were found.


'Wanding' for weapons at Los Angeles public schools

Los Angeles Times

For 23 years after L.A. schools started conducting random weapons checks on students, not a single parent complained, according to leaders at the Los Angeles Unified School District. The policy was instituted after a gun brought to school in 1993 by a 15-year-old accidentally discharged, killing another student. The random checks are carried out using a metal-detecting wand at varying times of the day in middle schools and high schools. But some parents are complaining now -- along with the charter-school chain Green Dot Public Schools and, surprisingly, the teachers union, United Teachers Los Angeles, which rarely finds itself in agreement on any subject with the charter schools. They allege that "wanding" makes students feel like criminal suspects and creates an environment that helps feed the school-to-prison pipeline.



Montebello School District reviewing transfers to Schurr

Los Angeles Times

The Montebello Unified School District sent out a news release on Wednesday: "The Montebello Unified School District (MUSD) has not received an official written notification from CIF regarding any allegations involving our athletic program at Schurr High School. However, we take any accusations very seriously and are currently reviewing the matter. Our priority at MUSD is to ensure each impacted student is able to pursue and obtain his individual educational and career goals."


la-me-edu-credit-recovery-explainer-20170703-htmlstory.html

Los Angeles Times

A guide to credit recovery in L.A. schools Math teacher Liliana Villalpando leads students through one of the credit-recovery courses at Garfield High School in December. In some cases, like with the in-person program called PASS (Performance Assessment Student Support), students can make up a failed grade in as little as a week. Community college: Students earn high school credit for passing a community college course that is comparable to the high school course they failed, with the principal's permission. At some schools, students who use this option can only earn a C. High school summer term: Students take courses at high schools over the summer to make up credits.