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Accelerating data-driven discoveries

#artificialintelligence

As technologies like single-cell genomic sequencing, enhanced biomedical imaging, and medical "internet of things" devices proliferate, key discoveries about human health are increasingly found within vast troves of complex life science and health data. But drawing meaningful conclusions from that data is a difficult problem that can involve piecing together different data types and manipulating huge data sets in response to varying scientific inquiries. The problem is as much about computer science as it is about other areas of science. That's where Paradigm4 comes in. The company, founded by Marilyn Matz SM '80 and Turing Award winner and MIT Professor Michael Stonebraker, helps pharmaceutical companies, research institutes, and biotech companies turn data into insights.


Announcing the First ODSC East 2020 Speakers!

#artificialintelligence

ODSC events for 2019 are all wrapped up, and now it's time to start thinking and planning for the next decade. Our first major event of 2020 will be ODSC East April 13-17 in Boston, MA, and we're excited to announce the first fifty speakers out of 280 schedule. ODSC East 2020 is expected to host over 250 speakers. Tom Mitchell is known as the "Father of Machine Learning" having founded the Machine Learning Department at Carnegie Mellon University and led it as Department Head for its first 10 years, teaching many famous students including Andrew Ng. He is a world-renowned researcher in machine learning, artificial intelligence, and cognitive neuroscience.


From DevOps to DataOps

@machinelearnbot

Over the past 10 years, many of us in technology companies have experienced the emergence of "DevOps." This new set of practices and tools has improved the velocity, quality, predictability and scale of software engineering and deployment. Starting at the large internet companies, the trend towards DevOps is now transforming (albeit slowly) the way that systems are developed and managed inside the enterprise -- often dovetailing with enterprise cloud adoption initiatives. Regardless of your opinion about on-prem vs. multi-tenant cloud infrastructure, the adoption of DevOps is undeniably improving how quickly new features and functions are delivered at scale for end users. I think there is much to be learned from the evolution of DevOps -- across the modern internet as well as within the modern enterprise -- most notably for those of us who work with data every day.


From DevOps to DataOps

@machinelearnbot

Over the past 10 years, many of us in technology companies have experienced the emergence of "DevOps." This new set of practices and tools has improved the velocity, quality, predictability and scale of software engineering and deployment. Starting at the large internet companies, the trend towards DevOps is now transforming (albeit slowly) the way that systems are developed and managed inside the enterprise -- often dovetailing with enterprise cloud adoption initiatives. Regardless of your opinion about on-prem vs. multi-tenant cloud infrastructure, the adoption of DevOps is undeniably improving how quickly new features and functions are delivered at scale for end users. I think there is much to be learned from the evolution of DevOps -- across the modern internet as well as within the modern enterprise -- most notably for those of us who work with data every day.


DataOps, Monetization, and the Rise of the Data Broker: Questioning Authority with Tamr CEO Andy Palmer

#artificialintelligence

This is the first in Blue Hill Research's occasional blog series "Questioning Authority with Toph Whitmore." As co-founder (with friend Michael Stonebraker) of Vertica, Andy Palmer ambitiously sought nothing less than to reinvent the database. In 2013, he and Stonebraker moved up the data value chain and founded Tamr, the Cambridge, MA-based software company aiming to provide a unified view of data in the modern enterprise. Palmer joined me for a discussion in which he talked Tamr, predicted the future of enterprise data management, and introduced a rather colorful (yet apt) analogy of which, he admits, his marketing team is less than fond. TOPH WHITMORE: Tell me about the genesis of Tamr.