Relevance of Blockchain In the Healthcare Industry - IntelligentHQ

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Time is undoubtedly an essential element in the field of healthcare and it can be reasonably be assumed that every moment should be used to its full potential in treating the patient. This is clearly not what is happening; just recently a mother had to wait seven hours after a fall before doctors could come and treat her broken back. Gaps in the healthcare system have given rise to multiple issues, ranging from the privacy of medical records to waiting times. Firstly, substantially long waiting times have always been a prevalent issue and the last few years are not an exception. In 2018, the NHS reported that a decade-high 4.3 million patients were awaiting an operation, with a growing number of them having to wait for more than the 18-week maximum waiting time for'planned non-urgent surgery', such as a hip or knee replacement.


Tech world debate on robots and jobs heats up

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Washington (AFP) - Are robots coming for your job? Although technology has long affected the labor force, recent advances in artificial intelligence and robotics are heightening concerns about automation replacing a growing number of occupations, including highly skilled or "knowledge-based" jobs. Just a few examples: self-driving technology may eliminate the need for taxi, Uber and truck drivers, algorithms are playing a growing role in journalism, robots are informing consumers as mall greeters, and medicine is adapting robotic surgery and artificial intelligence to detect cancer and heart conditions. Of 700 occupations in the United States, 47 percent are at "high risk" from automation, an Oxford University study concluded in 2013. A McKinsey study released this year offered a similar view, saying "about half" of activities in the world's workforce "could potentially be automated by adapting currently demonstrated technologies."


Why AI is about to make some of the highest-paid doctors obsolete - TechRepublic

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Radiologists bring home $395,000 each year, on average. In the near future, however, those numbers promise to drop to $0. Don't blame Obamacare, however, or even Trumpcare (whatever that turns out to be), but rather blame the rise of machine learning and its applicability to these two areas of medicine that are heavily focused on pattern matching, a job better done by a machine than a human. This is the argument put forward by Dr. Ziad Obermeyer of Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women's Hospital and Ezekiel Emanuel, PhD, of the University of Pennsylvania, in an article for the New England Journal of Medicine, one of the medical profession's most prestigious journals. Machine learning will produce big winners and losers in healthcare, according to the authors, with radiologists and pathologists among the biggest losers.


Hackers publish private photos from cosmetic surgery clinic

The Guardian

Hackers have published more than 25,000 private photos, including nude pictures, and other personal data from patients of a Lithuanian cosmetic surgery clinic, police say. The images were made public on Tuesday by a hacking group calling themselves "Tsar Team", which broke into the servers of the Grozio Chirurgija clinic earlier this year and demanded ransoms from the clinic's clients in more than 60 countries around the world, including the UK. Police say that following the ransom demand, a portion of the database was released in March, with the rest following on Tuesday. It's unclear how many patients have been affected, but police say dozens have come forward to report being blackmailed. We're talking about a serious crime," the deputy chief of Lithuania's criminal police bureau Andzejus Raginskis told reporters.


25 interesting European AI start-ups to watch in 2017

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Europe is a hotbed of AI innovation. Here are 25 AI start-ups to watch out for in 2017 and beyond. There are literally hundreds of promising companies pushing the boundaries of artificial intelligence and machine learning in Europe. We've included a number of Israel-based start-ups because they too fall into the sphere of influence of European investors. And, judging by recent acquisitions of Israel-based machine vision and AI companies by players like Apple and Intel, they are definitely producing the goods.