Goto

Collaborating Authors

BRUSSELS TERROR ATTACKS At least 31 dead, 180 wounded in coordinated rush-hour bombings at airport, subway station

FOX News

DEVELOPING: ISIS has claimed credit for Tuesday morning's rush-hour attacks in Brussels, which left at least 31 dead and more than 180 injured. As many as 31 people were killed and more than 180 injured as coordinated terrorist bombings rocked the Brussels airport and subway system during rush hour Tuesday morning in the Belgian capital. Two bombings at Zaventem Airport, where 11 people were reportedly killed, and another at the metro station in the Maelbeek section near the European Union headquarters, where the mayor's office said 20 were killed, were almost immediately confirmed as terrorism. The attack at the airport was reportedly accompanied by shouts in Arabic and gunfire, and an unexploded suicide belt was reportedly found in the aftermath. "What we feared has happened, we were hit by blind attacks."


Brussels Terror Attack Second In 15 Months, Terrorist Shot Dead After Explosion At Train Station

International Business Times

EDT- Interior Minister Jan Jambon announced that the Belgian security forces have identified the terrorist. "The terrorist's identity is known. We have been able to identify him," Jambon told RTBF radio television without giving further details, Agence France-Presse reported. A suspected terrorist bomber was shot dead by Belgian troops at Brussels Central Station, Tuesday, after a small explosion took place at the transportation hub at around 8:30 p.m. local time (2:30 p.m. EDT). Officials of the Belgian federal prosecutors confirmed that the central station explosion was being considered as a terrorist attack, Reuters reported.


Weakened Irma Leaves 3 Dead in Georgia, 1 in South Carolina

U.S. News

About 800 flights had been canceled at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport, which remained operational Monday, even as many planes turned corners of the tarmac into a parking lot. Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority suspended all bus and rail services Monday but said it would resume limited service Tuesday morning with plans to expand service as weather conditions improve. Downtown Atlanta's streets were eerily quiet, with restaurants, businesses and schools closed. Traffic flowed easily on the city's interstates, normally a sea of brake lights during rush hours.


Irma Whips Southeast: 2 Dead in Georgia, 1 in South Carolina

U.S. News

About 800 flights had been canceled at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport, which remained operational Monday, even as many planes turned corners of the tarmac into a parking lot. Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority suspended all bus and rail services Monday and would decide later whether to resume operations Tuesday. Downtown Atlanta's streets were eerily quiet, with restaurants, businesses and schools closed. Traffic flowed easily on the city's interstates, normally a sea of brake lights during rush hours.


Once the queen of the skies, the 747 will soon be just a flying truck

Los Angeles Times

The wide-bodied Boeing 747 was once known as the queen of the skies, an instantly recognizable behemoth revered for its luxury and spaciousness. As time passed, however, the original jumbo jet was outstripped by more efficient twin-engine planes. Now the 747's days as a passenger plane are numbered. Delta and United -- the last two U.S. airlines that fly 747s -- have said they will retire those planes from their fleet by the end of the year, 48 years after the jet first took flight. Today, Boeing Co. produces just six 747s a year.