How science can help us make AI more trustworthy

#artificialintelligence

Stories about racist Twitter accounts and crashing self-driving cars can make us think that artificial intelligence (AI) is a work in progress. But while these headline-grabbing mistakes reveal the frontiers of AI, versions of this technology are already invisibly embedded in many systems that we use everyday. These everyday uses include everything from fraud detection systems that monitor credit card transactions to email filters that learn not to swamp your inbox with spam. You've probably already interacted with an AI system today without even knowing it and probably enjoyed the experience. One increasingly common form of AI can be found in chatbots, a type of software that lets you interact with it by having a conversation.


How science can help us make AI less creepy and more trustworthy

#artificialintelligence

Stories about racist Twitter accounts and crashing self-driving cars can make us think that artificial intelligence (AI) is a work in progress. But while these headline-grabbing mistakes reveal the frontiers of AI, versions of this technology are already invisibly embedded in many systems that we use everyday. These everyday uses include everything from fraud detection systems that monitor credit card transactions to email filters that learn not to swamp your inbox with spam. You've probably already interacted with an AI system today without even knowing it and probably enjoyed the experience. One increasingly common form of AI can be found in chatbots, a type of software that lets you interact with it by having a conversation.


City University London experts warn us to not let chatbots take over our lives

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Artificially intelligent machines are no longer confined to science fiction novels but are an accepted part of everyday life. While we frequently interact with chatbots, such as Siri, there is now a serious push to make these computer-based'personalities' more trustworthy and likable. Simone Stumpf, senior lecturer in the Department of Computer Science at City University London, believes the key may actually be to make them less human. Microsoft wants to join the rest of the software giants in the AI game, but it just keeps striking out. Weeks ago the firm's lovable teen chatbot turned into a Hitler supporting racists and its most recent attempt, CaptionBot hasn't lived up to its potential either.


Even good robots are scarily unpredictable

Daily Mail - Science & tech

The heads of more than 100 of the world's top artificial intelligence companies are very alarmed about the development of'killer robots'. In an open letter to the UN, these business leaders – including Tesla's Elon Musk and the founders of Google's DeepMind AI firm – warned that autonomous weapon technology could be misused by terrorists and despots or hacked to perform in undesirable ways. But the real threat is much bigger – and not just from human misconduct but from the machines themselves. Research into complex systems shows how behaviour can emerge that is much more unpredictable than the sum of individual actions. The research into complex systems shows how behaviour can emerge that is much more unpredictable than the sum of individual actions.


10 of the Most Innovative Chatbots on the Web

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If you've ever used a customer support livechat service, you've probably experienced that vague, sneaking suspicion that the "person" you're chatting with might actually be a robot. Like the endearingly stiff robots we've seen in countless movies – tragic, pitiful machines tortured by their painfully restricted emotional range, futilely hoping to attain a greater degree of humanity – chatbots often sound almost human, but not quite. Their speech is awkward, the cadence somehow off. It's the online equivalent of the "Uncanny Valley," a mysterious region nestled somewhere between the natural and the synthetic that offers a disturbing glimpse at how humans are making machines that could eventually supplant humans, if only their designers could somehow make their robotic creations less nightmarish. Love them or hate them, chatbots are here to stay.