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Drones learn acrobatics by themselves

Robohub

Researchers from NCCR Robotics at the University of Zurich and Intel developed an algorithm that pushes autonomous drones to their physical limit. Since the dawn of flight, acrobatics has been a way for pilots to prove their bravery and worth. It is also a way to push the envelope of what can be done with an aircraft, learning lessons that are useful to all pilots and engineers. The same is true for unmanned flight. Professional drone pilots perform acrobatic maneuvers in dedicated competitions, pushing drones to their physical limits and perfecting their control and efficiency.


Navigation algorithm lets drones perform challenging acrobatics

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Scientists have developed a quadrotor helicopter, or quadcopter, that can learn to fly acrobatic manoeuvres that would challenge even a human operator. The drone, developed with US tech giant Intel, uses a navigation algorithm that allows it to autonomously perform tricks using on-board sensor measurements. In demonstrations, researchers flew power loops, barrel rolls and matty flips, during which the drone was subject to high thrust and extreme angular acceleration. A drone with the ability to perform tricky stunts will be more efficient in conventional operations, the research team say. It can be pushed to its physical limits, make full use of its agility and speed and cover more distance within its battery life.


This drone can play dodgeball – and win

Robohub

Drones can do many things, but avoiding obstacles is not their strongest suit yet – especially when they move quickly. Although many flying robots are equipped with cameras that can detect obstacles, it typically takes from 20 to 40 milliseconds for the drone to process the image and react. It may seem quick, but it is not enough to avoid a bird or another drone, or even a static obstacle when the drone itself is flying at high speed. This can be a problem when drones are used in unpredictable environments, or when there are many of them flying in the same area. Reaction of a few milliseconds In order to solve this problem, researchers at the University of Zurich have equipped a quadcopter (a drone with four propellers) with special cameras and algorithms that reduced its reaction time down to a few milliseconds – enough to avoid a ball thrown at it from a short distance.


New algorithm flies drones faster than human racing pilots

Robohub

To be useful, drones need to be quick. Because of their limited battery life they must complete whatever task they have – searching for survivors on a disaster site, inspecting a building, delivering cargo – in the shortest possible time. And they may have to do it by going through a series of waypoints like windows, rooms, or specific locations to inspect, adopting the best trajectory and the right acceleration or deceleration at each segment. The best human drone pilots are very good at doing this and have so far always outperformed autonomous systems in drone racing. Now, a research group at the University of Zurich (UZH) has created an algorithm that can find the quickest trajectory to guide a quadrotor – a drone with four propellers – through a series of waypoints on a circuit.


Flying high-speed drones into the unknown with AI

Robohub

When it comes to exploring complex and unknown environments such as forests, buildings or caves, drones are hard to beat. They are fast, agile and small, and they can carry sensors and payloads virtually everywhere. However, autonomous drones can hardly find their way through an unknown environment without a map. For the moment, expert human pilots are needed to release the full potential of drones. "To master autonomous agile flight, you need to understand the environment in a split second to fly the drone along collision-free paths," says Davide Scaramuzza, who leads the Robotics and Perception Group at the University of Zurich and the NCCR Robotics Rescue Robotics Grand Challenge.