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AI Grand Challenges for Education

AI Magazine

This article focuses on contributions that AI can make to address long-term educational goals. It describes five challenges that would support: (1) mentors for every learner; (2) learning twenty-first century skills; (3) interaction data to support learning; (4) universal access to global classrooms; and (5) lifelong and life-wide learning. A vision and brief research agenda are described for each challenge along with goals that lead to access to global educational resources and the reuse and sharing of digital educational resources. Instructional systems with AI technology are described that currently support richer experiences for learners and supply researchers with new opportunities to analyze vast data sets of instructional behavior from big databases, containing elements of learning, affect, motivation, and social interaction. Personalized learning is described using computational tools that enhance student and group experience, reflection, and analysis, and supply data for development of novel theory development.


AI Grand Challenges for Education

AI Magazine

This article focuses on contributions that AI can make to address longterm educational goals. Challenges are described that support: (1) mentors for every learner; (2) learning 21st century skills; (3) interaction data for learning; (4) universal access to global classrooms; and (5) lifelong and lifewide learning. A vision and brief research agenda are described for each challenge along with goals that lead to development of global educational resources and the reuse and sharing of digital educational resources. Instructional systems with AI technology are described that currently support richer experiences for learners and supply researchers with new opportunities to analyze vast data sets of instructional behavior from big databases that record elements of learning, affect, motivation, and social interaction. Personalized learning is described that facilitates student and group experience, reflection, and assessment.


Orienting trainers for digital classrooms - Artificial Intelligence Online

#artificialintelligence

With the corporate world embracing digital technologies, organisations are increasingly looking for resources with a difference who could enable them to create a distinctive presence in the marketplace. They are keen that the resources they onboard have analytical skills, visioning skills, learning skills, innovation capabilities, social skills and problem solving skills at all levels in the organisation--not just at the top. This is because digital transformation is unleashing a virtuous change at a regular interval to the processes and interactions with various stakeholders at multiple levels within the organisation and within the industry and it is expected of employees to adapt and respond quickly to these changes. Hence in addition to reorienting the employees within the organisation towards the need for the skills mentioned above, the new generation employees organisations wish to employ are expected to have these competencies. The mindset and the capabilities required to be successful in the digital era have to be developed while the next generation is still part of the academic system.


5 Ways AI is Changing the Education Industry

#artificialintelligence

AI is changing the world of education in dozens of different ways, and among those ways is how students learn. Numerous obstacles hinder education from reaching its fullest potential: space, opportunity to pay someone to do your homework, access, etc., and this access crisis are no mystery. We all know that many of our classrooms are not working very well, let alone meeting all the standards for optimal learning environments. What is it that is stopping us from getting better results? We need to consider 5 major reasons why AI may be solving many of the problems of today's classrooms.


'Girls Who Code' to build the next-gen female coders - Times of India

#artificialintelligence

Female aspirants can join any of the 100 clubs run by Girls Who Code to develop the technical skillset When Indian origin lawyer and politician Reshma Saujani, visited a some New York schools during her political campaign in 2012, she found only boys occupied the front rows in the Computer Science classes, while a handful of girls were present. The skewed sex ratio in those classrooms moved Reshma to an extent that she decided to start an initiative to bring gender parity in tech classrooms. Called Girls Who Code (GWC), the NGO has been working in the USA and last year expanded to Canada, UK and India to encourage female coders and technologists. "It all started after observing the gender disparity in Computer Science classrooms. GWC aims at giving access to the girl to learn and march into the world of technology," says Saujani, CEO of GWC.