Artificial intelligence system spots lung cancer before radiologists

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CHICAGO --- Deep learning - a form of artificial intelligence - was able to detect malignant lung nodules on low-dose chest computed tomography (LDCT) scans with a performance meeting or exceeding that of expert radiologists, reports a new study from Google and Northwestern Medicine. This deep-learning system provides an automated image evaluation system to enhance the accuracy of early lung cancer diagnosis that could lead to earlier treatment. The deep-learning system was compared against radiologists on LDCTs for patients, some of whom had biopsy confirmed cancer within a year. In most comparisons, the model performed at or better than radiologists. Deep learning is a technique that teaches computers to learn by example.


Artificial intelligence system spots lung cancer before radiologists

#artificialintelligence

CHICAGO --- Deep learning - a form of artificial intelligence - was able to detect malignant lung nodules on low-dose chest computed tomography (LDCT) scans with a performance meeting or exceeding that of expert radiologists, reports a new study from Google and Northwestern Medicine. This deep-learning system provides an automated image evaluation system to enhance the accuracy of early lung cancer diagnosis that could lead to earlier treatment. The deep-learning system was compared against radiologists on LDCTs for patients, some of whom had biopsy confirmed cancer within a year. In most comparisons, the model performed at or better than radiologists. Deep learning is a technique that teaches computers to learn by example.


Google Says Its AI Can Predict Lung Cancer Accurately

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A team of Google researchers has used a deep-learning algorithm to predict lung cancer accurately from computed scans. The work demonstrates the potential for Artificial Intelligence (AI) to increase both accuracy and consistency, which could help accelerate adoption of lung cancer screening worldwide. Lung cancer is the deadliest of all cancers worldwide -- more than breast, prostate, and colorectal cancers combined -- and it's the sixth most common cause of death globally, according to the World Health Organization. "Using advances in 3D volumetric modelling alongside datasets from our partners (including Northwestern University), we've made progress in modelling lung cancer prediction as well as laying the groundwork for future clinical testing," Shravya Shetty, M.S. Technical Lead at Google explained in a blog post late Monday. Google researchers created a model that can not only generate the overall lung cancer malignancy prediction (viewed in 3D volume) but also identify subtle malignant tissue in the lungs (lung nodules).


Google's AI boosts accuracy of lung cancer diagnosis, study shows - STAT

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One of lung cancer's most lethal attributes is its ability to trick radiologists. Some nodules appear threatening but turn out to be false positives. Others escape notice entirely, and then spiral without symptoms into metastatic disease. On Monday, however, Google unveiled an artificial intelligence system that -- in early testing -- demonstrated a remarkable talent for seeing through lung cancer's disguises. A study published in Nature Medicine reported that the algorithm, trained on 42,000 patient CT scans taken during a National Institutes of Health clinical trial, outperformed six radiologists in determining whether patients had cancer.


Artificial intelligence finds lung cancer

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Artificial intelligence is better than specialist doctors at diagnosing lung cancer, a US study suggests. The researchers at Northwestern University in Illinois and Google hope the technology could boost the effectiveness of cancer screening. Finding tumours at an earlier stage should make them easier to treat. The team said AI would have a "huge" role in the future of medicine, but the current software is not yet ready for clinical use. The study focused on lung cancer, which kills more people - 1.8 million a year - than any other type of cancer.