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Accelerating the discovery of new materials for 3D printing

#artificialintelligence

The growing popularity of 3D printing for manufacturing all sorts of items, from customized medical devices to affordable homes, has created more demand for new 3D printing materials designed for very specific uses. To cut down on the time it takes to discover these new materials, researchers at MIT have developed a data-driven process that uses machine learning to optimize new 3D printing materials with multiple characteristics, like toughness and compression strength. By streamlining materials development, the system lowers costs and lessens the environmental impact by reducing the amount of chemical waste. The machine learning algorithm could also spur innovation by suggesting unique chemical formulations that human intuition might miss. "Materials development is still very much a manual process. A chemist goes into a lab, mixes ingredients by hand, makes samples, tests them, and comes to a final formulation. But rather than having a chemist who can only do a couple of iterations over a span of days, our system can do hundreds of iterations over the same time span," says Mike Foshey, a mechanical engineer and project manager in the Computational Design and Fabrication Group (CDFG) of the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL), and co-lead author of the paper.


Machine-learning system accelerates discovery of new materials for 3D printing

#artificialintelligence

The growing popularity of 3D printing for manufacturing all sorts of items, from customized medical devices to affordable homes, has created more demand for new 3D printing materials designed for very specific uses. To cut down on the time it takes to discover these new materials, researchers at MIT have developed a data-driven process that uses machine learning to optimize new 3D printing materials with multiple characteristics, like toughness and compression strength. By streamlining materials development, the system lowers costs and lessens the environmental impact by reducing the amount of chemical waste. The machine learning algorithm could also spur innovation by suggesting unique chemical formulations that human intuition might miss. "Materials development is still very much a manual process. A chemist goes into a lab, mixes ingredients by hand, makes samples, tests them, and comes to a final formulation. But rather than having a chemist who can only do a couple of iterations over a span of days, our system can do hundreds of iterations over the same time span," says Mike Foshey, a mechanical engineer and project manager in the Computational Design and Fabrication Group (CDFG) of the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL), and co-lead author of the paper.


MIT accelerates the discovery of new 3D printing materials with open-source AI platform

#artificialintelligence

A partnership between the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the chemical giant BASF has managed to successfully create an AI-driven process to speed up the discovery of custom 3D printing materials. Chemists usually develop a few iterations of a material candidate over a couple of days and test them in the lab. The new machine-learning algorithm can churn out hundreds of those iterations with the desired characteristics in the same timeframe. This would save time and raw material costs, as well as lessen the environmental impact of the discarded chemicals. Not only that, but the algorithm may also come up with ideas that the material's engineer could have overlooked for various reasons.


AutoOED: Automated Optimal Experiment Design Platform

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

We present AutoOED, an Optimal Experiment Design platform powered with automated machine learning to accelerate the discovery of optimal solutions. The platform solves multi-objective optimization problems in time- and data-efficient manner by automatically guiding the design of experiments to be evaluated. To automate the optimization process, we implement several multi-objective Bayesian optimization algorithms with state-of-the-art performance. AutoOED is open-source and written in Python. The codebase is modular, facilitating extensions and tailoring the code, serving as a testbed for machine learning researchers to easily develop and evaluate their own multi-objective Bayesian optimization algorithms. An intuitive graphical user interface (GUI) is provided to visualize and guide the experiments for users with little or no experience with coding, machine learning, or optimization. Furthermore, a distributed system is integrated to enable parallelized experimental evaluations by independent workers in remote locations. The platform is available at https://autooed.org.


MIT demonstrates 3D printer capable of selectively applying gloss

ZDNet

MIT: "In this image, the left side shows traditional 3D printing, which doesn't have varying reflectivity. The right side shows the new improvements, where one can choose which surfaces are glossy and which are matte." The two most common desktop-style 3D printers are FDM (for fused deposition modeling) and SLA (or stereo lithography). FDM printers lay down layer after layer of filament, resulting in objects that have 3D printing's trademark layer lines. SLA printers use resin and light to produce prints that are often without lines and highly detailed.