Bayesian nightmare. Solved!

#artificialintelligence

Who has not heard that Bayesian statistics are difficult, computationally slow, cannot scale-up to big data, the results are subjective; and we don't need it at all? Do we really need to learn a lot of math and a lot of classical statistics first before approaching Bayesian techniques. Why do the most popular books about Bayesian statistics have over 500 pages? Bayesian nightmare is real or myth? Someone once compared Bayesian approach to the kitchen of a Michelin star chef with high-quality chef knife, a stockpot and an expensive sautee pan; while Frequentism is like your ordinary kitchen, with banana slicers and pasta pots. People talk about Bayesianism and Frequentism as if they were two different religions. Does Bayes really put more burden on the data scientist to use her brain at the outset because Bayesianism is a religion for the brightest of the brightest?


The Three Faces of Bayes

#artificialintelligence

Last summer, I was at a conference having lunch with Hal Daume III when we got to talking about how "Bayesian" can be a funny and ambiguous term. It seems like the definition should be straightforward: "following the work of English mathematician Rev. Thomas Bayes," perhaps, or even "uses Bayes' theorem." But many methods bearing the reverend's name or using his theorem aren't even considered "Bayesian" by his most religious followers. Why is it that Bayesian networks, for example, aren't considered… y'know… Bayesian? As I've read more outside the fields of machine learning and natural language processing -- from psychometrics and environmental biology to hackers who dabble in data science -- I've noticed three broad uses of the term "Bayesian."


The Three Faces of Bayes

#artificialintelligence

Last summer, I was at a conference having lunch with Hal Daume III when we got to talking about how "Bayesian" can be a funny and ambiguous term. It seems like the definition should be straightforward: "following the work of English mathematician Rev. Thomas Bayes," perhaps, or even "uses Bayes' theorem." But many methods bearing the reverend's name or using his theorem aren't even considered "Bayesian" by his most religious followers. Why is it that Bayesian networks, for example, aren't considered… y'know… Bayesian? As I've read more outside the fields of machine learning and natural language processing -- from psychometrics and environmental biology to hackers who dabble in data science -- I've noticed three distinct uses of the term "Bayesian."


Bayesian Learning for Machine Learning: Part 1 - Introduction to Bayesian Learning - DZone AI

#artificialintelligence

In this article, I will provide a basic introduction to Bayesian learning and explore topics such as frequentist statistics, the drawbacks of the frequentist method, Bayes's theorem (introduced with an example), and the differences between the frequentist and Bayesian methods using the coin flip experiment as the example. To begin, let's try to answer this question: what is the frequentist method? When we flip a coin, there are two possible outcomes -- heads or tails. Of course, there is a third rare possibility where the coin balances on its edge without falling onto either side, which we assume is not a possible outcome of the coin flip for our discussion. We conduct a series of coin flips and record our observations i.e. the number of the heads (or tails) observed for a certain number of coin flips. In this experiment, we are trying to determine the fairness of the coin, using the number of heads (or tails) that we observe.


Fast Bayesian Feature Selection for High Dimensional Linear Regression in Genomics via the Ising Approximation

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Feature selection, identifying a subset of variables that are relevant for predicting a response, is an important and challenging component of many methods in statistics and machine learning. Feature selection is especially difficult and computationally intensive when the number of variables approaches or exceeds the number of samples, as is often the case for many genomic datasets. Here, we introduce a new approach -- the Bayesian Ising Approximation (BIA) -- to rapidly calculate posterior probabilities for feature relevance in L2 penalized linear regression. In the regime where the regression problem is strongly regularized by the prior, we show that computing the marginal posterior probabilities for features is equivalent to computing the magnetizations of an Ising model. Using a mean field approximation, we show it is possible to rapidly compute the feature selection path described by the posterior probabilities as a function of the L2 penalty. We present simulations and analytical results illustrating the accuracy of the BIA on some simple regression problems. Finally, we demonstrate the applicability of the BIA to high dimensional regression by analyzing a gene expression dataset with nearly 30,000 features.