Go champion Lee Sedol scores first win against Google's DeepMind AlphaGo AI

Daily Mail - Science & tech

A human Go player has scored his first victory over an artificial intelligence computer program after'finding weaknesses' in the software. Google's AlphaGo computer had previously managed to win three games against Go world champion Lee Sedol in the five game match. This meant the company's DeepMind artificial intelligence program won the 1 million ( 706,388) prize for the match. South Korean professional Go player Lee Sedol puts the first stone against Google's artificial intelligence program (pictured), which he later went on to win in 180 moves. On Saturday Facebook chief executive Marc Zuckerberg, who is developing his own AI personal assistant technology, congratulated the Google team on their victory.


Can YOU beat a computer at chess? Interactive tool lets you play against an AI and see exactly what its thinking

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Artificial intelligence has shown what it can do when facing off against humans in ancient board games, with Deep Blue and Alpha Go already proving their worth on the world stage. While computers playing chess is nothing new, a new online version of the ancient game lifts the veil of AI to let players see what the AI is thinking. You make your move and then see the computer comes to life, calculating thousands of possible counter moves – but if you are terrible at chess to begin with, it probably won't help you much. Thinking Machine 6 is the latest in a line of AI-based concept art, with the third version a permanent installation at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Created by computer scientist and artist Martin Wattenberg and Marek Walczak, the last three versions have been taken online, with contributions from Johanna Kindvall and Fernanda Viégas.


Online chess game lets you see what the computer is thinking

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Artificial intelligence has shown what it can do when facing off against humans in ancient board games, with Deep Blue and Alpha Go already proving their worth on the world stage. While computers playing chess is nothing new, an online version of the ancient game lifts the veil of AI to let players see what the AI is thinking. You make your move and then see the computer come to life, calculating thousands of possible counter moves. Thinking Machine 6 is an AI-based concept art piece created by Martin Wattenberg. Rather than making players into chess champions, it shows the AI thinking process.


Google AI takes on master of ancient Chinese board game Go

Daily Mail - Science & tech

It's man vs machine this week as Google's artificial intelligence programme AlphaGo faces the world's top-ranked Go player in a contest expected to end in another victory for the machine. Google's artificial intelligence program AlphaGo took on the Chinese world number one of the ancient board game today in the first of three planned games, beating its human opponent by a narrow margin. It is the second time the AI has gone head-to-head with a master Go player in a public showdown, after stunning the world last year by trouncing South Korean grandmaster Lee Sedol four games to one. Google's artificial intelligence programme AlphaGo (right screen) will face the world's top-ranked Go player, China's 19-year-old Ke Jie (left), in a contest expected to end in another victory for rapid advances in AI. AlphaGo, part of Google's DeepMind project, competed against Ke Jie, currently ranked as the top player in the world, at an event held in the eastern Chinese water town of Wuzhen.


AlphaGo emerges victorious in human vs AI Go battle

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AlphaGo has won the fifth of five games of Go against South Korean grandmaster Lee Se-dol. The final game was a close-run thing, spilling into overtime with the AI just half-a-point ahead at one stage. The best-of-five tournament, which saw the software win 4-1, is considered to be a significant moment in the development of artificial intelligence. Go is a sophisticated game with more potential moves than there are atoms in the observable universe, requiring a greater capacity for on-the-fly "thinking". In a post on Google's Asia-Pacific blog, top American go player Michael Redmond said: "It was difficult to say at what point AlphaGo was ahead or behind, a close game throughout.