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Unique material design for brain-like computations

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Researchers at the U.S. Army Combat Capabilities Development Command's Army Research Laboratory say this may be changing as they endeavor to design computers inspired by the human brain's neural structure. As part of a collaboration with Lehigh University, Army researchers have identified a design strategy for the development of neuromorphic materials. "Neuromorphic materials is a name given to the material categories or combination of materials that provide both computing and memory capabilities in devices," said Dr. Sina Najmaei, a research scientist and electrical engineer with the laboratory. Najmaei and his colleagues published a paper, Dynamically reconfigurable electronic and phononic properties in intercalated Hafnium Disulfide (HfS2), in the May 2020 issue of Materials Today. The neuromorphic computing concept is an in-memory solution that promises orders of magnitude reductions in power consumption over conventional transistors, and is suitable for complex data classification and processing.


Spintronics research lays path for new type of memory

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With demands for ever more powerful computing devices, researchers are pushing at the limits of physics to explore alternatives to conventional computing, such as with photonics, quantum simulators, and spintronics. "Quantum materials hold great promise for improving the capacities of today's computers," said Professor Andrew Kent, a senior investigator. "The work draws upon their properties in establishing a new structure for computation." Kent worked alongside collaborators from the University of California-San Diego and the University of Paris-Saclay on the project. Professor Ivan Schuller, a San Diego physicist, explained: "Since conventional computing has reached its limits, new computational methods and devices are being developed. These have the potential of revolutionising computing and in ways that may one day rival the human brain."


Researchers discover unique material design for brain-like computations

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Over the past few decades, computers have seen dramatic progress in processing power; however, even the most advanced computers are relatively rudimentary in comparison with the complexities and capabilities of the human brain. Researchers at the U.S. Army Combat Capabilities Development Command's Army Research Laboratory say this may be changing as they endeavor to design computers inspired by the human brain's neural structure. As part of a collaboration with Lehigh University, Army researchers have identified a design strategy for the development of neuromorphic materials. "Neuromorphic materials is a name given to the material categories or combination of materials that provide both computing and memory capabilities in devices," said Dr. Sina Najmaei, a research scientist and electrical engineer with the laboratory. Najmaei and his colleagues published a paper, Dynamically reconfigurable electronic and phononic properties in intercalated Hafnium Disulfide (HfS2), in the May 2020 issue of Materials Today.


Intel Labs Director Talks Quantum, Probabilistic, and Neuromorphic Computing

IEEE Spectrum

Intel has done pretty well for itself by consistently figuring out ways of making CPUs faster and more efficient. But with the end of Moore's Law lurking on the horizon, Intel has been exploring ways of extending computing with innovative new architectures at Intel Labs. Quantum computing is one of these initiatives, and Intel Labs has been testing its own 49-qubit processors. Beyond that, Intel Labs is exploring neuromorphic computing (emulating the structure and, hopefully, some of the functionality of the human brain with artificial neural networks) as well as probabilistic computing, which is intended to help address the need to quantify uncertainty in artificial intelligence applications. Rich Uhlig has been the director of Intel Labs since December of 2018, which is really not all that long, but he's been at Intel since 1996 (most recently as Director of Systems and Software Research for Intel Labs) so he seems well qualified to hit the ground running.


Neuromophic Computing

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I saw a video article on Neuromorphic Computing the other day - something I had not really heard much about, though it ties in heavily to Artificial Intelligence which I, of course, do know about. Wow.. the possibilities are now endless. This is what Techopedia says about Neuromorphic Computing... Neuromorphic computing utilizes an engineering approach or method based on the activity of the biological brain. This type of approach can make technologies more versatile and adaptable, and promote more vibrant results than other types of traditional architectures, for instance, the von Neumann architecture that is so useful in traditional hardware design. Neuromorphic computing is also known as neuromorphic engineering.