Gameplay as On-Line Mediation Search

AAAI Conferences

Mediation is a plan-based interactive narrative generation algorithm that creates a cascading policy of plans. This policy represents a branching story and can be used by an execution manager in a game to control the series of events that unfold. With a few modifications we show that mediation's search space can embed all possible traversals through a game world. This shift allows gameplay to be modeled as an on-line mediation search where the game's interface is a representation of the underlying graph traversal. In this paper we outline these modifications and present a text-based implementation.


Agent Architecture Considerations for Real-Time Planning in Games

AAAI Conferences

Planning in real-time offers several benefits over the more typical techniques of implementing Non-Player Character (NPC) behavior with scripts or finite state machines. NPCs that plan their actions dynamically are better equipped to handle unexpected situations. The modular nature of the goals and actions that make up the plan facilitates reuse, sharing, and maintenance of behavioral building blocks. These benefits, however, come at the cost of CPU cycles. In order to simultaneously plan for several NPCs in real-time, while continuing to share the processor with the physics, animation, and rendering systems, careful consideration must taken with the supporting architecture. The architecture must support distributed processing and caching of costly calculations. These considerations have impacts that stretch beyond the architecture of the planner, and affect the agent architecture as a whole. This paper describes lessons learned while implementing real-time planning for NPCs for F.E.A.R., a AAA first person shooter shipping for PC in 2005.


0 IA SOF AI

AAAI Conferences

We propose that a planner should be provided with an explicit model of its own planning mechanism, and show that linking a planner's expectations about the performance of its plans to such a model, by means of explicit justification structures, enables the planner to determine which aspects of its planning are responsible for observed performance failures.


Some Studies in Machine Learning Using the Game of Checkers, II - Recent Progress

Classics

A new signature table technique is described together with an improved book learning procedure which is thought to be much superior to the linear polynomial method described earlier. Full use is made of the so called “alpha-beta” pruning and several forms of forward pruning to restrict the spread of the move tree and to permit the program to look ahead to a much greater depth than it other- wise could do. While still unable to outplay checker masters, the program’s playing ability has been greatly improved.See also:IEEE XploreAnnual Review in Automatic Programming, Volume 6, Part 1, 1969, Pages 1–36Some Studies in Machine Learning Using the Game of CheckersIBM J of Research and Development ll, No.6, 1967,601


Fluxplayer: A Successful General Game Player

AAAI Conferences

General Game Playing (GGP) is the art of designing programs that are capable of playing previously unknown games of a wide variety by being told nothing but the rules of the game. This is in contrast to traditional computer game players like Deep Blue, which are designed for a particular game and can't adapt automatically to modifications of the rules, let alone play completely different games. General Game Playing is intended to foster the development of integrated cognitive information processing technology. In this article we present an approach to General Game Playing using a novel way of automatically constructing a position evaluation function from a formal game description. Our system is being tested with a wide range of different games. Most notably, it is the winner of the AAAI GGP Competition 2006.