Image Recognition: A peek into the future

#artificialintelligence

Our brains are wired in a way that they can differentiate between objects, both living and non-living by simply looking at them. In fact, the recognition of objects and a situation through visualization is the fastest way to gather, as well as to relate information. This becomes a pretty big deal for computers where a vast amount of data has to be stuffed into it, before the computer can perform an operation on its own. Ironically, with each passing day, it is becoming essential for machines to identify objects through facial recognition, so that humans can take the next big step towards a more scientifically advanced social mechanism. So, what progress have we really made in that respect?


Bath researchers call for people with rare facial recognition skills

Daily Mail - Science & tech

While most of us find it easy to recognise highly familiar faces such as those of family and friends, identifying faces that we have only briefly encountered is much more difficult. In fact, some research suggests that even experienced passport control officers make a large number of errors when matching faces to identity documents. Yet, recent work reveals that a small number of people may have extraordinary face recognition skills, outperforming typical people on a range of face recognition tasks. Bath researchers found that a small number of people may have extraordinary face recognition skills, outperforming typical people on a range of face recognition tasks. 'Super recognisers' have an uncanny ability to recognise faces, remembering people they have not seen for decades, who have substantially changed in appearance, and who they have only fleetingly encountered.


FBI bosses grilled on secret face recognition program

Daily Mail - Science & tech

FBI bosses have been grilled over a secret facial recognition program that allows agents to access photos of tens of millions of Americans. The agency came under fire for its unrestricted access to ID photos in 18 states to help identify potential suspects - including innocent people who have never been charged with a crime. Privacy advocates suggested the technology fosters racial bias and compared the system to'Nazi Germany', at a congressional hearing yesterday. The system allows agents to access and algorithmically match the photos of tens of millions of Americans. More than 400million pictures of Americans' faces are kept in local, state and federal law enforcement facial recognition systems, the Government Accountability Office reported last year.


Facial Recognition: the Advent of a New Era in Non-Digital Marketing?

#artificialintelligence

The Facial Recognition Technology Is Known to Have Gained a Foothold in Many Industry Verticals and It Keeps on Continuously Charting New Ground. Facial Recognition has gained so much traction in an entire host of verticals and applications (according to Variant Market Research, its market is expected to be worth some $ 15.4 billion by 2024) that most anyone, regardless of the kind of business they are in, should look into whether the technology could come in handy in reaching their business objectives. In part, this is owing to the ability of the Facial Recognition technology to better equip and advance the field of expertise known as Marketing, - something universal and of the utmost importance to most industries. Moreover, Face Recognition can make a dent in precisely those areas of Marketing, in which the now rampant Digital Marketing falls short, or is, simply, irrelevant. What are those areas, how much headway has been made already and what are the potentialities one should be aware of?


Bath researchers call for people with rare facial recognition skills

Daily Mail - Science & tech

While most of us find it easy to recognise highly familiar faces such as those of family and friends, identifying faces that we have only briefly encountered is much more difficult. In fact, some research suggests that even experienced passport control officers make a large number of errors when matching faces to identity documents. Yet, recent work reveals that a small number of people may have extraordinary face recognition skills, outperforming typical people on a range of face recognition tasks. Bath researchers found that a small number of people may have extraordinary face recognition skills, outperforming typical people on a range of face recognition tasks. 'Super recognisers' have an uncanny ability to recognise faces, remembering people they have not seen for decades, who have substantially changed in appearance, and who they have only fleetingly encountered.