NASA picks the first partner to help build its lunar Gateway

Daily Mail - Science & tech

NASA is plowing ahead with its plans to send humans back to the moon, selecting its first commercial partner for developing the lunar'Gateway.' In a statement NASA announced that Maxar Technologies -- formerly SSL -- has been awarded $375 million to build power and propulsion systems for the lunar'Gateway,' a small spaceship that will orbit the moon and act as a layover for astronauts on lunar missions. From the'Gateway' astronauts will board landers and make the descent to the moon's service. A power and propulsion element of the Gateway is a 50-kilowatt solar spacecraft. An artist's impression is shown As reported by Ars Technica, Maxar will be joined by Jeff Bezo's aerospace company, Blue Origin, and Draper, who will help build, design, and operate the craft.


NASA reveals it will need as much as $30 BILLION to get to the moon by 2024

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Reality is setting in on an ambitious project to put astronauts back on the moon, which NASA says will cost tens of billions of dollars. According to a report from CNN, NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine said the agency will need to summon between $20 billion to $30 billion throughout the next five years in order to hit its goal of landing in 2024. That amount would constitute a $4 to $8 billion increase over NASA's current budget which stands at $20 billion. NASA is beginning to come back down to Earth with its ambitious plan to put humans back on the moon as soon as 2024. Bridenstine's comments are the first time that NASA has given any indication of the'Artemis' mission's price since it was outlined in a space directive two years ago.


Meet the 11 companies competing to put humans back on the moon: NASA selects top picks

Daily Mail - Science & tech

NASA has selected nearly a dozen companies to help design spacecraft that will bring humans back to the moon, including a woman for the first time. According to NASA, throughout the next six months, the selected partners, which include some of the biggest names is aerospace engineering, will work to design various elements of its upcoming Artemis mission slated for 2024. As a part of the mission, NASA plans to begin building a space station called'Gateway' which will act as a waypoint for astronauts exploring the moon. The station will begin construction in the next few years, and will eventually be launched into lunar orbit. NASA has selected nearly a dozen companies to help design spacecrafts that will bring humans back to the moon, including a woman for the first time.


NASA will put humans back on the moon 'to stay' by 2028, Bridenstine says

Daily Mail

The United States will have astronauts on the moon again in less than 10 years, NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine said today. And this time, he says, 'we will stay.' In a statement on the $21 billion 2020 budget, the NASA boss doubled down on plans to send humans first to the moon and then to Mars. With the new budget, which marks nearly a 6 percent increase from last year's, Bridenstine says NASA is on track to have humans back on the moon by 2028. The United States will have astronauts on the moon again in less than 10 years, NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine (pictured above, file photo) said today.


America is going back to the moon! NASA to team up with nine firms to create lunar base

Daily Mail

NASA has revealed plans to take America back to the moon - but will rely on private firms to run the missions. The space agency plans to work with nine private firms, ranging from small startups to giants like Lockheed Martin, to develop robotic landers and systems to mine the natural resources on the moon. This will help develop the technology need for eventual manned missions, and NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine pledged to have a manned lunar base within a decade. The first new lunar missions could blast off as early next year. The new missions will see the US return to the lunar surface for the first time since Apollo 17 in December 1972, the final mission of the crewed lunar exploration program (pictured, Gene Cernan, the last man to walk on the moon).