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BMW plans self-driving car launch by 2021

ZDNet

BMW wants to have its first fully driverless vehicle on the roads within five years, the German auto manufacturer's CEO Harald Krueger has revealed. Krueger voiced his ambition for BMW to launch its first autonomous vehicle at the company's annual shareholder meeting in Munich. BMW is currently focusing very much on its'i' electric car range and the Krueger sees the move into fully autonomous vehicles as a natural extension of this strategy. "In 2018, we will launch a BMW i8 Roadster. This will be followed in 2021 by the BMW i Next, our new innovation driver, with autonomous driving, digital connectivity, intelligent lightweight design, a totally new interior and ultimately bringing the next generation of electro-mobility to the road," he told shareholders.


Would you buy a self driving car? Researchers find nearly half of all Americans WON'T

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Almost half of Americans say they would never buy a fully self driving car, a new survey has found. The huge blow to the industry comes after rocky trials that have seen multiple accidents, including a self-driving Uber vehicle that killed a pedestrian in the first death involving a fully autonomous test vehicle in March. The Cox Automotive Evolution of Mobility Study found that consumer awareness of driverless vehicles has skyrocketed - but that people still want to be able to drive themselves. The research found 84 per cent want to have the option to drive themselves even in a self-driving vehicle, compared to 16 per cent who would feel comfortable letting an autonomous vehicle drive them without the option of being able to take control. It also found 84 per cent want to have the option to drive themselves even in a self-driving vehicle, compared to 16 per cent who would feel comfortable letting an autonomous vehicle drive them without the option of being able to take control.


Our autonomous future: How driverless cars will be the first robots we learn to trust

ZDNet

In March 2015, an Audi SQ5 began its nine-day journey from the Golden Gate Bridge to midtown Manhattan. The 3400-mile drive involved the normal obstacles: construction, highways, city driving, lane-passing. Until recently, the concept of a driverless car seemed like the stuff of science fiction. But much has changed in just a few short years as the technology behind autonomous vehicles has taken huge strides. The cross-country driving Audi, powered by technology from Delphi, drove in autonomous mode 99 percent of the time. The US federal government has also begun to embrace autonomous vehicles as a coming reality. In February 2016, the US Department of Transportation (US DOT) announced that it considers the AI powering Google's driverless cars (which have already logged hundreds of thousands of self-driven miles) officially a "driver"--marking a groundbreaking moment in the history of transportation.


Commentary: 2 Things That Need to Happen for Driverless Cars to Go Mainstream

#artificialintelligence

A whopping 73% of Americans don't trust autonomous cars, up from 63% in late 2017, according to a AAA survey released in May 2018. While competition is heating up--with players like Toyota, General Motors, Alphabet, and Tesla setting ambitious goals and making big bets--the question remains: Are Americans ready for driverless cars? As I've studied complex organizational transformations over the past decade, I've come to recognize what must happen to create the behavioral change that makes adoption of new technologies successful. A societal shift toward self-driving vehicles will require such massive behavioral change, especially as trust continues to plummet. But just because we wouldn't get behind that self-turning wheel today, doesn't mean we wouldn't take that chance tomorrow.


Being a driverless car passenger proves 'unsettling and extraordinary'

The Guardian

How many people does it take to drive a driverless car? It is, to be fair, barely even a prototype. The autonomous car unveiled in Milton Keynes last week is bleeding-edge engineering, Britain's entry in a global race to get the first driverless car on the road. The converted Range Rover Sport can steer itself, speed up and slow down, stop at red lights and move off when they turn green. It can even cope with roundabouts, a fundamental skill in Milton Keynes.