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Hackers targeted voter registration systems in 21 states, feds say

FOX News

Election officials in 21 states have been notified by the Department of Homeland Security that hackers targeted voter registration systems ahead of last year's presidential election. In most cases, the systems were not breached. A small number of networks were compromised, but those affected were not involved in the actual tallying of votes. In most of the states, the targeting involved preparatory activity, such as scanning computer systems. Alabama, Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Illinois, Iowa, Maryland, Minnesota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Washington and Wisconsin had confirmed they had been targeted as of Friday evening.


Fuji recalls sushi sold at Trader Joe's, 7 Eleven over listeria concerns

FOX News

Fox News Flash top headlines for Dec. 3 are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com Heads up, sushi fanatics: Fuji Food Products, Inc. has announced a recall of its ready-to-eat sushi – as well as spring rolls and salads – sold at Trader Joe's, 7 Eleven, Walgreens and more popular stores across the East Coast and the Upper Midwest over concerns the products are contaminated with listeria. Affected items were sold or distributed in various states, such as Alabama, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Vermont, Virginia, Washington D.C., West Virginia and Wisconsin. The products were also distributed to various stores, namely 7 Eleven, Walgreens, Food Lion, Hannaford, Trader Joe's, Giant Eagle Supermarkets, Porkys, Bozzutos, Supreme Lobster and Superior Foods, according to a recall notice posted the FDA's website.


L.A. police, county sheriff's department on first-ever federal list of agencies not honoring ICE detainers

Los Angeles Times

The Department of Homeland Security on Monday released the first ever report on law enforcement agencies that are potentially "endangering Americans" by failing to cooperate with ICE detainers and named multiple jurisdictions in California. As part of a Trump administration directive to "highlight" uncooperative police agencies, the weekly "Declined Detainer Outcome Report," lists those that have failed to honor U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement requests to further detain suspects so they can be processed for possible deportation. "When law enforcement agencies fail to honor immigration detainers and release serious criminal offenders, it undermines ICE's ability to protect the public safety and carry out its mission," said Acting ICE Director Thomas Homan. Monday's detainer report listed 10 jurisdictions that fail to comply with detainers "on a routine basis." They are: Clark County, Nevada; Nassau County, New York; Cook County, Illinois; Montgomery County, Iowa; Snohomish County, Washington; Franklin County, New York; Washington County, Oregon; Alachua County, Florida; Franklin County, Iowa; and Franklin County, Pennsylvania.


California, Wisconsin Deny Election Systems Targeted by Russian Hackers

U.S. News

DHS told states including Ohio, Alabama, Alaska, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Minnesota, Texas, Virginia, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Iowa, Maryland and Washington state they were targeted by Russian hackers but said the hackers were not successful. Arizona and Illinois confirmed last year that they were targets.


Florida Eases Self-Driving Car Rules: Are States And Cities On The Hook For Mishaps?

#artificialintelligence

Jurisdictions might be on-the-hook for their self-driving car laws that allow autonomous cars and for which might get into mishaps or crashes. Florida just passed a law that widens the door for self-driving driverless cars to roam their public roadways and do so without any human back-up driver involved. Some see dangers afoot, others see progress and excitement. Ron DeSantis, governor of Florida, declared that by approving the new bill it showed that "Florida officially has an open-door policy to autonomous vehicle companies." There are now 29 states that have various driverless laws on their books, per the National Conference of State Legislatures: Alabama, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Michigan, Mississippi, Nebraska, New York, Nevada, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Vermont, Washington, and Wisconsin, plus Washington, D.C. Here's a question that some politicians and regulators are silently grappling with, albeit some think that they have the unarguably "right" answer and thusly have no need to lose sleep over the matter: Should states, counties, cities and townships be eagerly courting self-driving autonomous cars onto their public roadways, or should those jurisdictions be neutral about inviting them into their locales, or should they be highly questioning and require "proof until proven safe" before letting even one such autonomous car onto their turf?