Welsh hospital uses da Vinci machine to perform 350 operations in 18 months

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men in the UK, with more than 40,000 new cases diagnosed every year. But help in beating this form of life-threatening disease is coming in an usual form - from robots. A revolutionary form of surgery that uses a state-of-the-art robot to remove tumours has treated more than 350 patients in its first 18 months in a hospital in Wales. A revolutionary form of surgery which uses a state-of-the-art robot to remove tumours has treated more than 350 patients in its first 18 months in a hospital in Wales. Named the da Vinci robot, the equipment is being used three days a week in the University Hospital of Wales, and solely on prostate cancer patients.


We ask... the rise of robosurgeons: revolution or rip-off?

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Robotic surgeons are on the march. Across the NHS they are taking over thousands of operations from their human counterparts for prostate cancer or kidney and bladder surgery. Science fiction has become science fact.


Robotic surgery set to transform medical care in the Gulf

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DUBAI: When it comes to man versus machine, many industries, including medical science, are at a critical juncture. Advancements in technology are creating a world where robots are performing tasks with speed and efficiency unmatched by their human counterparts. Increasingly, robots are becoming a familiar presence in operating theaters, especially in the Gulf. Experts predict that the region could become the leader in the field of robotic surgery. In June, Johns Hopkins Aramco Healthcare (JHAH) -- the result of a joint venture between Saudi Aramco and Johns Hopkins Medicine -- became the first hospital in the Kingdom to perform a robot-assisted hysterectomy.


Here's what you need to know before going under the robo-knife

Daily Mail - Science & tech

First, you are strapped from the chest upwards on to the table, with your feet hoisted into stirrups. The table is swung down backwards, so you are tilted, head-down, at an angle of 45 degrees. Then a machine, known by some surgeons as'the 800lb gorilla', can get to work. It sounds so medieval, but this is the most modern of surgical techniques -- robotic surgery. The extraordinary posture, known as the steep Trendelenburg, is necessary to position the patient precisely so the robot arms can reach inside them.


Would YOU trust a robot surgeon?

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Cancer and heart operations could soon be carried out entirely by robots - reducing the risk of mistakes, according to new research. Scientists have shown for the first time a supervised autonomous robot can successfully perform soft tissue surgery. Although robots have been used in hospitals for decades, they can only be worked by surgeons. Now a supervised autonomous robot has been able to successfully perform soft tissue surgery, outperforming experts in open bowel surgery in pigs. Scientists have shown for the first time a supervised autonomous robot can successfully perform soft tissue surgery.