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Amazon to acquire autonomous driving startup Zoox – TechCrunch

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Amazon announced Friday that it will acquire Zoox, a self-driving startup founded in 2014 that has raised nearly $1 billion in funding and which aims to develop autonomous driving technology, including vehicles, for the purposes of providing a full-stack solution for ride-hailing. Zoox will continue to exist as a standalone business, according to Amazon's announcement, with current CEO Aicha Evans continuing in her role, as well as CTO and co-founder Jesse Levinson. Their overall company mission will also remain the same, the release notes. The Financial Time reports that the deal is worth $1.2 billion. The Wall Street Journal had reported at the end of May that Amazon was looking at Zoox as a potential acquisition target, and that the deal had reached the advanced stages.


NuTonomy starts trials in Singapore of self-driving taxi service

PCWorld

NuTonomy is offering rides in its self-driving taxis to select residents of Singapore from Thursday, ahead of a commercial launch of the service in 2018. The trials on the smartphone app-based service follows an agreement earlier this month between NuTonomy, a startup set up by two former MIT experts in the areas of robotics and intelligent vehicle technology, and Singapore's Land Transport Authority (LTA) to begin trials of an autonomous mobility-on-demand transportation service. The NuTonomy trial comes ahead of similar tests planned by Uber Technologies later this month on the streets of Pittsburgh in the U.S. NuTonomy said its new "robo-taxi" service, which will include specially configured Renault Zoe or Mitsubishi i-MiEV electric vehicles, will run on an on-going basis within Singapore's one-north business district, where the company has been conducting daily autonomous vehicle testing since April. You can see a video of the trial here. The vehicles will be fully autonomous but an engineer from the company will ride in the vehicle both to monitor its performance and to also take over control if required at some point for safety or other reasons.


Autonomous vehicles are just around the corner

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EVERY DAY AROUND 10m people take an Uber. The company has made ride-hailing commonplace in more than 600 cities in 82 countries. But the Volvo XC90 picking its way through traffic on a wintry morning in Pittsburgh is no ordinary Uber. Climb into the back, and you will see a screen mounted between the front seats, showing a digital representation of the world around the car, with other vehicles, pedestrians and cyclists highlighted as clusters of blue dots. Tap the screen to say you are ready to leave, and the car starts to move.


Autonomous vehicles are just around the corner

#artificialintelligence

EVERY DAY AROUND 10m people take an Uber. The company has made ride-hailing commonplace in more than 600 cities in 82 countries. But the Volvo XC90 picking its way through traffic on a wintry morning in Pittsburgh is no ordinary Uber. Climb into the back, and you will see a screen mounted between the front seats, showing a digital representation of the world around the car, with other vehicles, pedestrians and cyclists highlighted as clusters of blue dots. Tap the screen to say you are ready to leave, and the car starts to move.


Xconomy: NuTonomy Switches to Chrysler For More Elbow Room in Self-Driving Cars

#artificialintelligence

There's a time in a self-driving car company's life where a minivan is just more sensible than a sleek, European city car. NuTonomy, the autonomous vehicle startup spun out of MIT that's putting its systems through their paces on the streets of South Boston, says it has "decommissioned" its fleet of five-door, "supermini" electric cars manufactured by French automaker Renault under the brand name Zoe, according to a quarterly update the startup filed with the city of Boston. NuTonomy has been testing the vehicles on the city streets since January 2017. "The Zoe vehicle platform, with significant customizations, has performed all of our autonomous testing in Boston to date," the company writes. "However, as our engineering and design teams evaluated the technology requirements and customer needs in a fully autonomous vehicle, it became clear that the Zoe could not meet all of the criteria."