Oxford University is getting into fintech

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Oxford University, the centuries-old British education institution, is branching out into fintech. The university's Saïd Business School announced on Wednesday that it will launch an online short course in fintech -- financial technology for the uninitiated -- that is designed to help prepare business executives for a future where more and more financial services functions are based around tech. "Oxford Saïd has a commitment to preparing global executives for the challenges of both today and tomorrow," Peter Tufano, the Peter Moores Dean and Professor of Finance at the school, told Business Insider over email. "Our faculty have been active in fintech research and teaching, up to and including starting fintech companies, so have a significant expertise to draw upon to help students in their journey." Oxford has launched the programme in conjunction with educational technology firm GetSmarter, which was recently acquired by fellow ed-tech business 2U for $103 million (£78 million). The course will run for 10 weeks, costing £2,500, and aims to teach people a broad range of skills relevant to fintech.


Microsoft launches online business school to teach executives the basics of AI

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An AI business school that teaches executives how to use artificial intelligence technology to improve their company has been launched by Microsoft. The free, online AI Business School will be the first in the world to help bosses learn about the technology behind AI, how to use it throughout their organisation, prepare their staff for its adoption and ensure it is used responsibly. Lectures and videos lasting up to 10 minutes, which can be accessed on-demand, will feature insights from senior Microsoft staff including Chief Financial Officer Amy Hood, Chief Marketing Officer Chris Capossela and Executive Vice-President Jean-Phillipe Courtois. Ian Fordham, Chief Learning and Skills Officer at Microsoft UK, said: "According to our own research, half of all UK organisations think their business model will be disrupted by AI within the next five years, yet only 20% of organisations are developing the skills of their staff to harness the potential of this technology to transform their ...


AI developers: don't forget ethics London Business School

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Human biases can become part of the technology people create, according to Nicos Savva, Associate Professor of Management Science and Operations at London Business School. A recent House of Lords Select Committee on Artificial Intelligence (AI) "AI in the UK: Ready, Willing and Able?" urged people using and developing AI to put ethics centre stage. The committee suggested a cross-sector AI Code, with five principles that could be applied globally including that artificial intelligence should "be developed for the common good and benefit of humanity" and should "operate on principles of intelligibility and fairness". The committee's chairman, Lord Clement-Jones, said in a statement: "The UK has a unique opportunity to shape AI positively for the public's benefit and to lead the international community in AI's ethical development, rather than passively accept its consequences." He added that "AI is not without its risks".


Business schools bridge the artificial intelligence skills gap

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There is much more to a successful technology product than its code. Companies seeking to exploit artificial intelligence need employees who understand how machine learning works and how it can be applied in business. But people who can do both are hard to find. Smith School of Business in Toronto is trying to fill that gap with North America's -- and it believes the world's -- first master of management in artificial intelligence (MMAI). This month, 40 students are beginning the programme, studying topics such as how to apply AI in finance and the ethical implications of the technology, intertwined with hands-on training in natural language processing and deep learning (the use of artificial neural networks in advanced pattern recognition).


Rise of the machines

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ASK 100 students what they want from an MBA programme and you're likely to get 100 different answers. However, ask them what they want more of, and trends are easier to discern. At the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University, a survey of the current class earlier this year asked what students wanted to learn more about. "It has rapidly consumed a lot of mental real estate with our MBA students," says Brian Uzzi, who teaches a course on AI to MBAs at Kellogg. AI has become a key tool for businesses in all industries.