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Uber CEO choice Khosrowshashi accepts: reports

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Expedia CEO Dara Khosrashahi has reportedly been offered the top job at Uber, though it's currently unclear if he has accepted the offer. The Iranian-American businessman took the helm of travel site Expedia in August of 2005. SAN FRANCISCO -- Dara Khosrowshashi, Uber's choice to lead the embattled ride-hailing company, will accept the offer, according to interviews with The Wall Street Journal and Bloomberg Tuesday. In his first public comments since Uber confirmed Sunday that the 48-year-old was its choice to succeed departed chief executive Travis Kalanick, the Expedia CEO told the media outlet that details were being finalized. Uber did not immediately respond to a request for comment.


Classic car's amazing journey

FOX News

Today, a flight from New York to Paris is a mere seven-hour journey, but when this 1907 Thomas Flyer Model 35 set out from the Big Apple, the journey was far more challenging. Plucked from Thomas' showroom in Manhattan a mere three days before the race, the 60-horsepower, 4,500 car stood for years as a testament to the Buffalo, New York, automaker's high quality engineering. Now, the car has been entered into the Historic Vehicle Association's National Historic Vehicle Register, which means that documents relating to the Flyer will be stored permanently at the Library of Congress. The HVA has also done the same for cars like the Shelby Cobra Daytona prototype, the original Meyers Manx dune buggy, and the Marmon Wasp that won the first Indy 500. As for the Flyer, its story is among the most intriguing.


10 most important tech trends of the decade

#artificialintelligence

Apple CEO Steve Jobs unveils the iPad on January 27, 2010, in San Francisco. When I hustled out of CNET headquarters in San Francisco on May 26, 2010, and slipped into a rental car with two of my co-workers to head to a meeting across the Bay, one of them slipped me a copy of The Wall Street Journal and pointed to a headline that announced Apple had passed Microsoft to become the world's most valuable tech company. "What do you think of that?" she said. "Unreal," I responded, shaking my head. Just over a decade earlier, Apple had nearly been on its deathbed and needed a $150 million investment from Microsoft simply to stay alive.


Chemistry Nobel highlights lithium-ion batteries, seen as foundation for a greener future

The Japan Times

STOCKHOLM – If you're reading this on a cellphone or laptop computer, you might thank the three winners of this year's Nobel Prize in chemistry for their work on lithium-ion batteries. The batteries power cellphones, laptops, electric cars and countless other devices of modern life, and could become the foundation for a greener future. Batteries that economically store energy from renewable sources like the wind and sun open up new possibilities to curb global warming. "This is a highly charged story of tremendous potential," quipped Olof Ramstrom of the Nobel committee for chemistry. The prize announced Wednesday went to John B. Goodenough, 97, an engineering professor at the University of Texas; M. Stanley Whittingham, 77, a chemistry professor at the State University of New York at Binghamton; and Akira Yoshino, 71, of chemical company Asahi Kasei Corp. and Meijo University in Japan.


Nobel prize in chemistry goes to developers of lithium-ion batteries

New Scientist

The 2019 Nobel prize in Chemistry has been awarded to John Goodenough, Stanley Whittingham and Akira Yoshino for the development of lithium-ion batteries. Lithium-ion batteries are found in everything from mobile phones to laptops and electric cars. They have revolutionised our lives, and laid the foundation for a wireless, fossil fuel-free society, says the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. "We can see an enormous, dramatic effect on society because of this fantastic battery," said Olof Ramström, a member of the Nobel Committee. During the oil crisis in the 1970s, Stanley Whittingham, now at Binghamton University in the US, developed the first ever lithium battery.