Goto

Collaborating Authors

Government minister to demand Tinder and Grindr explain what they're doing to protect children

The Independent - Tech

The culture secretary Jeremy Wright is to question Tinder and Grindr about measures used to protect children after police records showed they are at risk of grooming and sexual exploitation on the dating apps. The Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) said he was "truly shocked" to discover the perpetrators of child sex offences had used online dating services. Mr Wright said: "I will be writing to these companies asking what measures they have in place to keep children safe from harm, including verifying their age. "If I'm not satisfied with their response, I reserve the right to take further action." Police have investigated more than 30 incidents of child rape since 2015 where victims were sexually exploited after evading age checks on dating apps, according to The Sunday Times. Dwain Chambers made his sprint comeback in the 60m event at the British Indoor Championships. The 40-year-old came in second during his heat with a time of 6.78 however after a ...


Cambridge Analytica: What is the company now embroiled in Facebook data controversy?

The Independent - Tech

British data analytics firm Cambridge Analytica is at the centre of controversy in the US and UK after two newspapers reported the company harvested personal data about Facebook users beginning in 2014. Best known for assisting the 2016 presidential campaign of US President Donald Trump, Cambridge Analytica is now facing a government search of its London office, questions from US state authorities, and a demand by Facebook that it submit to a forensic audit. The UK's Information Commissioner has announced she is seeking a warrant to probe the company's servers – and also that she was forced to tell Facebook to "stand down" its own enquiries after its auditors and lawyers visited Cambridge Analytica's offices. "Such a search would potentially compromise a regulatory investigation," Elizabeth Denham said. Here is some of what is known about Cambridge Analytica.


Cambridge Analytica: UK data watchdog applies for warrant to search firm's servers as Facebook told to 'stand down' its own probe

The Independent - Tech

Britain's Information Commissioner will seek a warrant to search computers and servers used by the London-based political consulting firm Cambridge Analytica (CA), which is accused of using the personal data of tens-of-millions of Facebook members to influence 2016's US presidential election. Elizabeth Denham said the company had failed to cooperate after she issued a Demand for Access to records and data it held on 7 March. "Cambridge Analytica has not responded to the commissioner by the deadline provided. Therefore, the Information Commissioner is seeking a warrant to obtain information and access to systems and evidence related to her investigation," her office said in a statement. A whistleblower, Christopher Wylie, who worked with CA, claimed the company had amassed the data of some 50 million people through a personality quiz on Facebook called This is Your Digital Life, created by academic Aleksandr Kogan, of Global Science Research.


'I was shocked it was so easy': meet the professor who says facial recognition can tell if you're gay

The Guardian

Vladimir Putin was not in attendance, but his loyal lieutenants were. On 14 July last year, the Russian prime minister, Dmitry Medvedev, and several members of his cabinet convened in an office building on the outskirts of Moscow. On to the stage stepped a boyish-looking psychologist, Michal Kosinski, who had been flown from the city centre by helicopter to share his research. "There was Lavrov, in the first row," he recalls several months later, referring to Russia's foreign minister. "You know, a guy who starts wars and takes over countries." Kosinski, a 36-year-old assistant professor of organisational behaviour at Stanford University, was flattered that the Russian cabinet would gather to listen to him talk. "Those guys strike me as one of the most competent and well-informed groups," he tells me. Kosinski's "stuff" includes groundbreaking research into technology, mass persuasion and artificial intelligence (AI) – research that inspired the creation of the political consultancy Cambridge Analytica. Five years ago, while a graduate student at Cambridge University, he showed how even benign activity on Facebook could reveal personality traits – a discovery that was later exploited by the data-analytics firm that helped put Donald Trump in the White House.