Wendy's adds automation to the fast-food menu

Los Angeles Times

Wendy's Co., home of the old-fashioned burger, is serving up something cutting-edge: self-service ordering kiosks. The Dublin, Ohio-based fast-food company is adding machines to at least 1,000 restaurants, or about 15% of its stores, by the end of the year. Wendy's began installing these kiosks last year, enabling diners to order without help from behind-the-counter workers. Wendy's is joining other eateries that are marching toward automation for at least some of the dining experience. Panera Bread has said it plans to add touch-screen kiosks to all its restaurants within a few years.


Will AI Take My Job? McDonald's Stock Hits High, Analysts Credit Upgrades Like Self-Serve Kiosks

International Business Times

McDonald's has long been the first job for legions of teenagers, but they soon could be getting competition from a new source: the fast food chain's automated kiosks. McDonald's share price hit a record $154 Thursday, and analysts credited the company's gradual move toward self-serve kiosks, CNBC reported. Within the past year, McDonald's eateries across the country have installed large kiosks where customers can place their own orders. Through the kiosks, you can construct orders and customize burgers or meals without needing a human cashier. The chain hopes to have the kiosks installed in 2,500 restaurants by the end of the year and also plans to launch mobile ordering in 14,000 locations within the same timeframe.


Chefs and truck drivers beware: AI is coming for your jobs

#artificialintelligence

Robots aren't replacing everyone, but a quarter of U.S. jobs will be severely disrupted as artificial intelligence accelerates the automation of existing work, according to a new Brookings Institution report. Thursday's report from the Washington think tank says roughly 36 million Americans hold jobs with "high exposure" to automation--meaning at least 70 percent of their tasks could soon be performed by machines using current technology. Among those most likely to be affected are cooks, waiters and others in food services; short-haul truck drivers; and clerical office workers. "That population is going to need to upskill, reskill or change jobs fast," said Mark Muro, a senior fellow at Brookings and lead author of the report. Muro said the timeline for the changes could be "a few years or it could be two decades."


Robots could absolutely devastate the retail market

Mashable

Robots are coming for retail jobs. In-store automation threatens to kill four in 10 positions in the retail sector throughout the next decade, according to a new study. That could add up to 7.5 million lost jobs--proportionally a much bigger hit than even manufacturing took when automation devastated its labor market, according to Cornerstone Capital Group, the bank behind the report. SEE ALSO: Trump's treasury secretary is'not worried at all' about job-killing AI It's not as if retail workers don't have enough to keep them up at night. Hundreds of store employees have lost their jobs over the past few years as online shopping and excess store space plunge the traditional retail industry into choppy waters.


Over 30 million U.S. workers will lose their jobs because of AI

#artificialintelligence

Robots aren't replacing everyone, but a quarter of U.S. jobs will be severely disrupted as artificial intelligence accelerates the automation of existing work, according to a new Brookings Institution report. The report, published Thursday, says roughly 36 million Americans hold jobs with "high exposure" to automation -- meaning at least 70 percent of their tasks could soon be performed by machines using current technology. Among those most likely to be affected are cooks, waiters and others in food services; short-haul truck drivers; and clerical office workers. "That population is going to need to upskill, reskill or change jobs fast," said Mark Muro, a senior fellow at Brookings and lead author of the report. Muro said the timeline for the changes could be "a few years or it could be two decades."