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NASA shares bird's-eye-view photo of Perseverance taken by Ingenuity

Daily Mail - Science & tech

NASA has shared a'bird's eye view' image of the Perseverance rover, taken by the Ingenuity helicopter as it soared above the Martian surface. In a tweet, the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) team said: 'I spy with my little eye…a rover,' sharing the image with Perseverance visible in the top left corner. It was taken during the third flight of the autonomous copter that happened on April 25 and saw it fly to an altitude of 16ft and travel for 64ft before landing again. At the peak it was moving at 6.6ft per second, or 4.5 miles per hour. In contrast, the Perseverance rover, captured in the latest images, travels at 0.1 miles per hour. Ingenuity is a technical demonstration, with no science experiments on board, as it is designed to prove a flying vehicle could be used on the Red Planet.


NASA's Ingenuity completes FOURTH flight on Mars that was 'farther and faster than ever before'

Daily Mail - Science & tech

NASA announced Friday that Ingenuity successfully completed its fourth flight, which saw the small helicopter'fly farther and faster than ever before.' The $85 million drone traveled 872 feet (266 meters) at a height of 16 feet (5 meters) for two minutes. The American space agency received the data downlink at 1:39pm ET that showed the copter took off from'Wright Brothers Field' under the watchful gaze of the Perseverance rover at 10:12am ET. Perseverance, which sat some 210 feet away, snapped a picture of its travel companion's fourth flight through the thin atmosphere on Mars. It also took more photos as it flew over the Martian surface.


NASA's Ingenuity helicopter to attempt its SIXTH flight on Mars next week

Daily Mail - Science & tech

NASA's Ingenuity helicopter is going to attempt a sixth flight on Mars next week, reaching speeds of up to nine miles per hour and flying for over two minutes. This will be the first flight as part of the'operations demonstration phase' that includes helping the Perseverance rover in its mission to find ancient signs of life. Ingenuity will scout multiple surface features from the air during its short flight, before landing in a different airfield to the one it takes off from for the first time. It will head up 33 feet into the Martian sky and then fly 492ft southwest at about nine miles per hour, taking photographs of rocks and dunes on the ground. In this new phase, data and images from the flight will be returned to Earth in the days following the flight, rather than in the following hours as with earlier trips. NASA's Ingenuity helicopter is going to attempt a sixth flight on Mars next week, reaching speeds of up to nine miles per hour and flying for over two minutes This will be the first flight as part of the'operations demonstration phase' that includes helping the Perseverance rover in its mission to find ancient signs of life Ingenuity was designed as a technology demonstrator rather than carrying any of its own science experiments or equipment.


NASA reveals enhanced side-by-side videos from Ingenuity's first flight

Daily Mail - Science & tech

NASA has revealed a new'motion filter' video of the history-making Ingenuity helicopter flying on Mars showing just where the dust travelled around the craft. While Ingenuity was sent to the Red Planet as a'technical demonstration' with no science mission of its own, NASA says it could help scientists better understand how dust travels through the atmosphere of the Red Planet. The video, shot by the Mastcam-Z camera on the Perseverance rover, reveals plumes of Martian dust made by Ingenuity upon takeoff and landing. After the successful flight on Monday April 19, NASA named the airfield that hosted the takeoff the'Wright Brothers Field' in honour of the aeroplane inventors. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) say they will now be pushing the 4lb helicopter'to the limit' in a series of future flights between now and early-May. While Ingenuity was sent to the Red Planet as a'technical demonstration' with no science mission of its own, NASA says this could help scientists better understand how dust travels through the atmosphere of the Red Planet The main purpose of Mastcam-Z, a camera mounted on a mast attached to Perseverance, is to take photos and video in high definition.


NASA's Mars helicopter is going bigger and bolder TODAY

Daily Mail - Science & tech

NASA's Ingenuity Mars helicopter is making a second, bolder and more daring flight on the Red Planet today, going higher than its first history making flight on Monday. The US space agency said it would climb up to 16ft above the surface, hover briefly, tilt and move sideways for 7ft, take a series of colour photos and then land. It is set to take off at 10:30 BST, but due to delays in getting data to travel the 181 million miles between Earth and Mars, we won't know if it has worked until 14:21 BST. Flying on Mars is particularly challenging due to the fact its atmosphere is just 1% of Earth's at ground level, and while the lower gravity, a third of that on Earth, helps, it is only a partial offset against the thinner atmosphere. This means that in order to fly, the helicopter has to be ultra-light and rotate its blades extremely fast, up to 2,500 rpm, in order to achieve lift. Ingenuity made its first historic flight on Monday April 19, going up 10ft, hovering, snapping a photo, and returning to the newly named'Wright Brothers Field'.