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US approves artificial-intelligence device for diabetic eye problems

#artificialintelligence

US regulators Wednesday approved the first device that uses artificial intelligence to detect eye damage from diabetes, allowing regular doctors to diagnose the condition without interpreting any data or images. The device, called IDx-DR, can diagnose a condition called diabetic retinopathy, the most common cause of vision loss among the more than 30 million Americans living with diabetes. Its software uses an artificial intelligence algorithm to analyze images of the eye, taken with a retinal camera called the Topcon NW400, the FDA said. "A doctor uploads the digital images of the patient's retinas to a cloud server on which IDx-DR software is installed," said the agency in a statement. The answer comes back that the patient's eye problem is "more than mild" and they should seek treatment from a specialist, or it is negative for diabetic retinopathy and the patient can be rescreened in a year.


US approves artificial intelligence device for diabetic eye problems

#artificialintelligence

The device, called IDx-DR, can diagnose diabetic retinopathy, the most common cause of vision loss among the more than 30 million Americans living with diabetes. US regulators Wednesday approved the first device that uses artificial intelligence to detect eye damage from diabetes, allowing regular doctors to diagnose the condition without interpreting any data or images. The device, called IDx-DR, can diagnose a condition called diabetic retinopathy, the most common cause of vision loss among the more than 30 million Americans living with diabetes. Its software uses an artificial intelligence algorithm to analyze images of the eye, taken with a retinal camera called the Topcon NW400, the FDA said. "A doctor uploads the digital images of the patient's retinas to a cloud server on which IDx-DR software is installed," said the agency in a statement.


US approves artificial intelligence device for diabetic eye problems - The Express Tribune

#artificialintelligence

WASHINGTON: US regulators Wednesday approved the first device that uses artificial intelligence to detect eye damage from diabetes, allowing regular doctors to diagnose the condition without interpreting any data or images. The device, called IDx-DR, can diagnose a condition called diabetic retinopathy, the most common cause of vision loss among the more than 30 million Americans living with diabetes. Its software uses an artificial intelligence algorithm to analyse images of the eye, taken with a retinal camera called the Topcon NW400, the FDA said. Telefonica launches'Aura' voice assistant in six countries "A doctor uploads the digital images of the patient's retinas to a cloud server on which IDx-DR software is installed," said the agency in a statement. The answer comes back that the patient's eye problem is "more than mild" and they should seek treatment from a specialist, or it is negative for diabetic retinopathy and the patient can be rescreened in a year.


FDA approves AI-powered software to detect diabetic retinopathy

Engadget

An additional 84.1 million have prediabetes, which often leads to the full disease within five years. It's important to detect diabetes early to avoid health complications like heart disease, stroke, amputation of extremities and vision loss. Technology increasingly plays an important role in early detection, too. In that vein, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has just approved an AI-powered device that can be used by non-specialists to detect diabetic retinopathy in adults with diabetes. Diabetic retinopathy occurs when the high levels of blood sugar in the bloodstream cause damage to your retina's blood vessels.


FDA approves America's first ever AI medical device that doesn't need a doctor

Daily Mail - Science & tech

US health regulators have approved the first ever artificially intelligent medical device that can identify disease without need for a doctor. The device, called IDx-DR, is designed to detect the most common cause of vision loss among more than 30 million Americans living with diabetes. Its in-built camera takes a picture of the patient's eye, which is assessed by an algorithm to determine whether there are signs of diabetic retinopathy. The move, announced on Wednesday, makes this the first AI device to receive FDA approval to screen without need for a doctor to interpret the results. It means any doctor could use it, including primary care physicians who interact far more frequently with patients with diabetes, rather than patients having to seek out eye doctors themselves.