Grindr and Similar Apps Should Adopt HIPAA-Like Protocols to Protect Users' Data and Regain Their Trust

Slate

This post is part of Outward, Slate's home for coverage of LGBTQ life, thought, and culture. Earlier this week, Buzzfeed News reported that Grindr had been sharing user information with third-party app-testing companies. This revelation unleashed a wave of criticism against the gay dating app for potentially putting its users at risk of having information from their profiles, including HIV status, released more widely than they had intended or understood when they consented to using the app. The company has since ended the practice. In the wake of Facebook's scandal regarding the sale of user information to Cambridge Analytica, the BuzzFeed report felt to many like another grievance in a long line of grievances regarding the misuse of social media–user information.


Stephen Hawking - Wikipedia

@machinelearnbot

Stephen William Hawking CH CBE FRS FRSA (8 January 1942 – 14 March 2018)[14][15] was an English theoretical physicist, cosmologist, author and Director of Research at the Centre for Theoretical Cosmology within the University of Cambridge.[16][17] His scientific works included a collaboration with Roger Penrose on gravitational singularity theorems in the framework of general relativity and the theoretical prediction that black holes emit radiation, often called Hawking radiation. Hawking was the first to set out a theory of cosmology explained by a union of the general theory of relativity and quantum mechanics. He was a vigorous supporter of the many-worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics.[18][19] Hawking was an Honorary Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts (FRSA), a lifetime member of the Pontifical Academy of Sciences, and a recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the highest civilian award in the United States. In 2002, Hawking was ranked number 25 in the BBC's poll of the 100 Greatest Britons. He was the Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at the University of Cambridge between 1979 and 2009 and achieved commercial success with works of popular science in which he discusses his own theories and cosmology in general. His book, A Brief History of Time, appeared on the British Sunday Times best-seller list for a record-breaking 237 weeks. Hawking had a rare early-onset slow-progressing form of motor neurone disease (also known as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Lou Gehrig's disease), that gradually paralysed him over the decades.[20][21] Even after the loss of his speech, he was still able to communicate through a speech-generating device, initially through use of a hand-held switch, and eventually by using a single cheek muscle. Hawking was born on 8 January 1942[22] in Oxford to Frank (1905–1986) and Isobel Hawking (née Walker; 1915–2013).[23][24] Despite their families' financial constraints, both parents attended the University of Oxford, where Frank read medicine and Isobel read Philosophy, Politics and Economics.[24] The two met shortly after the beginning of the Second World War at a medical research institute where Isobel was working as a secretary and Frank was working as a medical researcher.[24][26] They lived in Highgate; but, as London was being bombed in those years, Isobel went to Oxford to give birth in greater safety.[27] Hawking had two younger sisters, Philippa and Mary, and an adopted brother, Edward.[28] In 1950, when Hawking's father became head of the division of parasitology at the National Institute for Medical Research, Hawking and his family moved to St Albans, Hertfordshire.[29][30]


Stephen Hawking Bridged Science and Popular Culture

WSJ.com: WSJD - Technology

The University of Cambridge professor was an iconic figure in both the scientific community and in popular culture, known for his keen mind and humor, as well as his striking physical challenges. Dr. Hawking had long battled with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, which left him wheelchair-bound for most of his life. Commonly known as Lou Gehrig's disease or motor neuron disease, the condition damages the nerves that control movement and results in paralysis. Patients with ALS typically die within five years of diagnosis. Dr. Hawking, who was diagnosed in 1963 at the age of 21, is believed to have been the longest-living survivor, a fact that still perplexes neurologists.


Ex-Intel CEO Andy Grove dies at age 79

Mashable

Andy Grove, the former Intel Corp. chief executive whose youth under Nazi occupation and escape from the Iron Curtain inspired an "only the paranoid survive" management philosophy that saved the chip maker from financial ruin in the 1980s, has died. Intel said Grove died on Monday. It did not specify a cause of death. Grove, who was instrumental in building Intel into the world's largest chip company during his 37-year career there, had suffered from Parkinson's disease. He also suffered from prostate cancer in the mid-1990s.


Andy Grove remembered as 'bridge builder'

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Andy Grove, legendary CEO of Intel and a noted technologist. Grove died March 21, 2016 at the age of 79. (Photo: Intel) Andy Grove, the late former CEO and chairman of Intel, didn't like being called a visionary and likely would have stayed away from any event that named him one, according to friends and former colleagues who gathered last week in Silicon Valley to do just that. "That's why we're doing this posthumously," said Kevin Surace, CEO of the software-testing startup Appvance and chairman of the Silicon Valley Forum, the non-profit group that honored Grove and three others at their 19th Annual Visionary Awards in Burlingame, Calif. It was the first time the group has issued its award posthumously. Amid dinner and wine served at the historic Kohl Mansion, a line of tech industry luminaries recalled Grove, who died in March of Parkinson's disease at age 79, as a no-nonsense executive.