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Watch live: Press Briefing with Principal Deputy Press Secretary Sarah Sanders

Los Angeles Times

Homeland Security will tighten airport security - but won't ban laptops Tougher airport screening but no laptop ban for flights headed to U.S. Crunch time for McConnell after he is forced to delay Senate healthcare vote for at least 10 days Some in conservative media raise concerns about proposed GOP cuts in medicaid Trump succeeds where Obama failed - spawning a new wave of liberal activism Senate healthcare bill would add 22 million uninsured and raise costs for poor and sick, Congressional Budget Office says Tougher airport screening but no laptop ban for flights headed to U.S.


Gorsuch is pushing Supreme Court to the right on religion, guns and gays

Los Angeles Times

Homeland Security will tighten airport security - but won't ban laptops Tougher airport screening but no laptop ban for flights headed to U.S. Crunch time for McConnell after he is forced to delay Senate healthcare vote for at least 10 days Some in conservative media raise concerns about proposed GOP cuts in medicaid Trump succeeds where Obama failed - spawning a new wave of liberal activism Senate healthcare bill would add 22 million uninsured and raise costs for poor and sick, Congressional Budget Office says Tougher airport screening but no laptop ban for flights headed to U.S. When Judge Neil M. Gorsuch went before the Senate in March as President Trump's first nominee to the Supreme Court, he sought to assure senators he would be independent and above the political fray. "There is no such thing as a Republican judge or Democratic judge," he said more than once. But in just his first few weeks on the high court, Justice Gorsuch has shown himself to be a confident conservative activist, urging his colleagues to move the law to the right on religion, gun rights, gay rights and campaign funding. He dissented along with Justice Clarence Thomas when the court rejected a gun-rights challenge to California's law that strictly regulates who may carry a concealed weapon. "The 2nd Amendment's core purpose," they said, shows "the right to bear arms extends to public carry."


Passengers will face tighter screening at airports - but can still carry laptops and e-readers

Los Angeles Times

It's crunch time for McConnell after he is forced to delay Senate healthcare vote Tougher airport screening but no laptop ban for flights headed to U.S. Crunch time for McConnell after he is forced to delay Senate healthcare vote for at least 10 days Some in conservative media raise concerns about proposed GOP cuts in medicaid Trump succeeds where Obama failed - spawning a new wave of liberal activism Senate healthcare bill would add 22 million uninsured and raise costs for poor and sick, Congressional Budget Office says Tougher airport screening but no laptop ban for flights headed to U.S. No new laptop bans, but travelers to the U.S. will face tighter screening all over the globe Homeland Security officials said Wednesday they will order stricter passenger screening and other new security measures for all flights entering the United States but will not bar laptop computers in carry-on luggage as airlines and passenger groups had feared. The new order will cover about 2,000 flights a day from 280 airports in 105 countries, a move that could make international flying even more onerous just as the busy summer travel season starts. Security officials would not detail the new measures but said passengers headed to the United States will face more intensive screening at airports, and probably more security dogs. They gave no date for when the new procedures will start. If carriers don't implement the measures effectively, Homeland Security still may ban laptops, e-readers and other electronic devices larger than cell phones from cargo holds as well as passenger cabins.


When he meets South Korea's president, Trump will be asking for trade concessions and help confronting North Korea

Los Angeles Times

Homeland Security will tighten airport security - but won't ban laptops Tougher airport screening but no laptop ban for flights headed to U.S. Crunch time for McConnell after he is forced to delay Senate healthcare vote for at least 10 days Some in conservative media raise concerns about proposed GOP cuts in medicaid Trump succeeds where Obama failed - spawning a new wave of liberal activism Senate healthcare bill would add 22 million uninsured and raise costs for poor and sick, Congressional Budget Office says Tougher airport screening but no laptop ban for flights headed to U.S. When he meets South Korea's president, Trump will be asking for trade concessions and help confronting North Korea President Trump plans to pressure South Korean President Moon Jae-in to make trade concessions when they meet Friday, while at the same time seeking closer cooperation against North Korea's accelerating nuclear program. Both aims, outlined Wednesday by a senior administration official, could make for some difficult discussions, especially since the newly elected Moon campaigned for a softer approach to the government in Pyongyang. Moon, who arrived Wednesday in Washington, began his four-day visit by laying a wreath at a memorial at Marine Corps Base Quantico in northern Virginia to the U.S. Marines who died during the Korean War in the battle at Chosin Reservoir. Trump will host Moon and his wife, Kim Joon-suk, for dinner at the White House on Thursday before the two leaders meet one-on-one in the Oval Office on Friday morning. Having criticized the two countries' trade agreement when he was running for president, Trump will argue for a more balanced trade relationship, the administration official said in a background briefing.


Trump will meet face-to-face with Putin in Germany next week

Los Angeles Times

Homeland Security will tighten airport security - but won't ban laptops Tougher airport screening but no laptop ban for flights headed to U.S. Crunch time for McConnell after he is forced to delay Senate healthcare vote for at least 10 days Some in conservative media raise concerns about proposed GOP cuts in medicaid Trump succeeds where Obama failed - spawning a new wave of liberal activism Senate healthcare bill would add 22 million uninsured and raise costs for poor and sick, Congressional Budget Office says Tougher airport screening but no laptop ban for flights headed to U.S. President Trump has governed five months under a cloud of questions about his relationship with Russian President Vladimir Putin, yet the two men will meet next week for the first time, on the sidelines of the G20 summit of world leaders in Hamburg, Germany. White House officials on Thursday confirmed plans for the private meeting, but said no decisions have been made about the topics Trump will raise. So it's unclear whether they will discuss Russia's election-year cyberattacks that are the focus of criminal and congressional investigations. "Our relationship with Russia is not different from any other country in terms of us communicating with them, really, what are concerns are, where we see problems in the relationship but also opportunities," said Trump's national security advisor, H.R. McMaster. McMaster said he expected the two men to have "a broad, wide-ranging discussion" about problems in the relationship but also about where the U.S. and Russia have "common interests."